A Collection of Family Records: With Biographical Sketches, and Other Memoranda of Various Families and Individuals Bearing the Name Douglas, Or Allied to Families of that Name

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Charles Henry James Douglas
E.L. Freeman & Company, 1879 - Digital images - 563 pages
 

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Page 32 - We do not know them in the fountain, but in the stream ; not in the root, but in the stem ; for we know not who was the first mean man that did by his virtue raise himself above the vulgar.
Page 40 - He was, for a time, all-powerful with King James II., who made him lieutenant-general of the realm; but afterwards losing the royal favour, he seems to have entered into a confederacy against the king, by whom he was killed in Stirling Castle, in 1452. Leaving no child, he was...
Page 42 - Grandtully, was said to have given birth at Paris to twin sons in 1748. One of them died in 1753; the other in 1761 was served heir of entail and provision general to the Duke of Douglas. An attempt was made to reduce his service, on the ground that he was not...
Page 32 - , harried the monks of Melrose, and was the first man of mark who joined Wallace in the rising against the English in 1297. It appears that he possessed lands in one English and in seven Scottish counties — Northumberland, Berwick, Edinburgh, Fife, Lanark, Ayr, Dumfries and Wigtown. His son, the Good Sir James Douglas (c. 1286-1330), called also 'the Black Douglas...
Page 40 - ... nine lords. The last Earl lived many years in England, where he had a pension from the Crown and was made a Knight of the Garter. In 1484 he leagued himself with the exiled Duke of Albany to invade Scotland. He was defeated at Lochmaben, but James III.
Page 43 - EARLS OF MORTON. — Sir Andrew of Douglas, who appears in record in 1248, was apparently a younger son of sir Archibald, or Erkenbald, of Douglas, the second chief of the house.
Page 35 - King of Scotland, one Donald Bane (that is, Donald the White or Fair) having possest himself of all the Western Islands (called Ebudes or Hebrides), and intitling himself King thereof, aspired to set the crown of Scotland also upon his head. For effectuating whereof he gathered a great army, wherein he confided so much that he set foot on the nearest continent of Scotland, to wit, the province of Kintyre and Lome. The King's Lievetenants, Duchal and Culen, made head against him with such forces as...
Page 43 - Douglas, who. in 1296, swore fealty to king Edward I. for his lands in West Lothian, and who was probably the father of sir James of Douglas — surnamed of Lothian, to distinguish him from his kinsman of Clydesdale — who, in 1315, had a grant from Bruce of the lands of Kincavil and Calder-clere. He died about 1320, being succeeded by his son, sir William of Douglas of Liddesdale, who acquired the lordship of Dalkeith (by resignation of the Grahames), the barony of Aberdour in Fife, lands in Tweeddale,...
Page 42 - good earl," as he was called, died in 1588, when his title devolved on his kinsman William, the grandson of sir William Douglas of Glenbervie, second son of Archibald Bell-the-Cat. Dying in 1591, he was succeeded by his son William, who next year obtained from the crown a special...
Page 35 - In the mean time a certain nobleman, disdaining to see so bad a cause have such good successe, out of his love to his prince and desire of honour, accompanied with his sons and followers, made an onset upon these prevailing rebels with such courage and resolution that he brought them to a stand, and then heartening the discouraged fliers, both by word and example...

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