A Collection of the Proverbs of All Nations: Compared, Explained, and Illustrated

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Warren F. Draper, 1869 - Proverbs - 232 pages
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Page 63 - tis the soul of peace : Of all the virtues, 'tis nearest kin to heaven ; It makes men look like gods. The best of men That e'er wore earth about him, was a sufferer; A soft, meek, patient, humble, tranquil spirit : The first true gentleman, that ever breathed.
Page 92 - This, however, was afterwards of use to me, the impression continuing on my mind; so that often when I was tempted to buy some unnecessary thing, I said to myself, Don't give too much for the whistle ; and I saved my money.
Page vi - THE genius, wit, and spirit of a nation are discovered in its proverbs," this is Lord Bacon's wellworn remark; although, indeed, only well-worn because of its truth.
Page 57 - This is the excellent foppery of the world, that when we are sick in fortune — often the surfeit of our own behaviour — we make guilty of our disasters the sun, the moon and the stars...
Page 135 - He that will not when he may, When he will he shall have nay.
Page 57 - ... we make guilty of our disasters the sun, the moon, and the stars: as if we were villains by necessity; fools by heavenly compulsion; knaves, thieves, and treachers, by spherical predominance; drunkards, liars, and adulterers, by an enforced obedience of planetary influence; and all that we are evil in, by a divine thrusting on: an admirable evasion of whoremaster man, to lay his goatish disposition to the charge of a star!
Page 14 - Marriage is a desperate thing. The Frogs in JEsop were extreme wise ; they had a great mind to some Water, but they would not leap into the Well, because they could not get out again.
Page 209 - A swarm of bees in May is worth a load of hay. A swarm of bees in June is worth a silver spoon. A swarm of bees in July is not worth a fly.
Page 114 - said he ; " you that have lived sae lang in Zetland, to risk the saving of a drowning man ? Wot ye not, if you bring him to life again, he will be sure to do you some capital injury ? * — Come, Master Mordaunt, bear a hand to what's mair to the purpose.
Page 216 - Well then, quoth Master More, how say you in this matter ? What think ye to be the cause of these shelves and flats that stop up Sandwich haven ? Forsooth, Sir, quoth he, I am an old man ; I think that Tenterton steeple is the cause of Goodwin sands. For I am an old man, Sir...

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