A companion to Hume

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Blackwell Pub., 2008 - Biography & Autobiography - 573 pages
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David Hume's revolutionary philosophies took an empirical approach to the study of human nature. Controversial in his time, he was accused of everything from atheism to moral corruption; he has since been recognized as one of the foremost thinkers of the late modern period, influencing the thought of nearly every philosopher in his wake. The arguments presented in his writings have survived three centuries of varying perspectives, and have had a lasting influence on the philosophy of mind, knowledge, religion, action, morality, economics, and politics.

"A Companion to Hume" is the ideal resource for the study of one of history's most remarkable thinkers, demonstrating the range of Hume's work and illuminating the ongoing debates that they have generated. Comprised of twenty-nine expertly commissioned essays addressing such expansive topics of knowledge, passion, morality, religion, economics, and politics, this collection examines the paradoxes of Hume's thought and his legacy, covering the methods, themes, and consequences of his contributions to philosophy.

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Contents

Hume in the Enlightenment Tradition
21
Humes Theory of Ideas
41
Hume on Memory and Imagination
58
Copyright

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About the author (2008)

Elizabeth S. Radcliffe is Professor of Philosophy at Santa Clara University. Her areas of specialization include Hume, ethical theory, motivational psychology, and seventeenth- and eighteenth-century philosophy. She is the author of On Hume (2000), editor of A Companion to Hume (Blackwell, 2007), and was co-editor of the journal Hume Studies from 2000 to 2005.

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