A Companion to Plato's Republic for English Readers: Being a Commentary Adapted to Davies and Vaughan's Translation

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Rivington, Percival & Company, 1895 - 430 pages
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Page 309 - Be there, for once and all, severed great minds from small, Announced to each his station in the Past ! Was I the world arraigned, were they my soul disdained, Right?
Page 33 - For we are lovers of the beautiful, yet simple in our tastes, and we cultivate the mind without loss of manliness. Wealth we employ, not for talk and ostentation, but when there is a real use for it. To avow poverty with us is no disgrace; the true disgrace is in doing nothing to avoid it.
Page 32 - And we have not forgotten to provide for our weary spirits many relaxations from toil; we have regular games and sacrifices throughout the year; at home the style of our life is refined; and the delight which we daily feel in all these things helps to banish melancholy.
Page 106 - We would not have our guardians grow up amid images of moral deformity, as in some noxious pasture, and there browse and feed upon many a baneful herb and flower day by day, little by little, until they silently gather a festering mass of corruption in their own soul.
Page 32 - ... if he does what he likes ; we do not put on sour, looks at him, which, though harmless, are not pleasant. While we are thus unconstrained in our public intercourse, a spirit of reverence pervades our public acts; we are prevented from doing wrong by respect for authority, and for the laws...
Page 240 - Every art and every investigation, and likewise every practical pursuit or undertaking, seems to aim at some good: hence it has been well said that the Good is That at which all things aim.
Page 21 - When several villages are united in a single community, perfect and large enough to be nearly or quite self-sufficing, the state comes into existence, originating in the bare needs of life, and continuing in existence for the sake of a good life.
Page 22 - Thus the state is by nature clearly prior to the family and to the individual, since the whole is of necessity prior to the part; for example, if the whole body be destroyed, there will be no foot or hand.
Page 25 - ... of rich men and the like, which are said to arise out of the possession of private property. These evils, however, are due to a very different cause —the wickedness of human nature. Indeed, we see that there is much more quarrelling among those who have all things in common, though there are not many of them when compared with the vast numbers who have private property.
Page 12 - Homer and Hesiod have ascribed to the gods all things that are a shame and a disgrace among mortals, stealings and adulteries and deceivings of one another.

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