A comparative grammar of the Sanskrit, Zend, Greek, Latin, Lithuanian, Gothic, German, and Sclavonic languages, Volume 1

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Williams and Norgate, 1856 - Indo-European languages
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Page 96 - Sanscrit, and the languages which are akin to it, two classes of roots : from the one, which is by far the more numerous, spring verbs, and nouns (substantives and adjectives) which stand in fraternal connection with the verbs, not in the relation of descent from them, not begotten by them, but sprung from the same shoot with them. We term them, nevertheless, for the sake of distinction, and according to prevailing custom, Verbal Roots...
Page 103 - First, Languages with monosyllabic roots, without the capability of contraction, and hence without organism, without grammar. This class comprises Chinese, where all is hitherto bare root, and the grammatical categories and secondary relations after the main point, can only be discovered from the position of the roots in the sentence. Secondly, Languages with monosyllabic roots, which are capable of combination, and obtain their organism and grammar nearly in this way alone.
Page ix - Grammar could only be recovered by the process of a severe regular etymology, calculated to bring back the unknown to the known, the much to the little ; for this remarkable language, which in many respects reaches beyond, and is an improvement on, the Sanskrit, and makes its theory more attainable, would appear to be no longer intelligible to the disciples of Zoroaster. Rask, who had the opportunity to satisfy himself on this head, says expressly (V. d. Hagen, p. 33) that its forgotten lore has...
Page vi - The relations of the ancient Indian languages to their European kindred are, in part, so palpable as to be obvious to every one who casts a glance at them, even from a distance : in part, however, so concealed, so deeply implicated in the most secret passages of the organization of the language, that we are compelled to consider every language subjected to a comparison with it, as also the language itself, from new stations of observation, and to employ the highest powers of grammatical science and...
Page 101 - Je pense, cependant, qu'il faut assigner le premier rang aux langues à inflexions. On pourroit les appeler les langues organiques, parce qu'elles renferment un principe vivant de développement et d'accroissement, et qu'elles ont seules, si je puis m'exprimer ainsi, une végétation abondante et féconde.
Page xii - Rask claims for it perhaps in too high a degree," and adds that " we are unwilling to receive the Zend as a mere dialect of the Sanscrit, and to which we are compelled to ascribe an independent existence, resembling that of the Latin as compared with the Greek, or the old Northern with the Gothic. It in many respects reaches beyond, and is an improvement on. the Sanscrit.
Page 102 - En modifiant les lettres radicales, et en ajoutant aux racines des syllabes dérivatives, on forme des mots dérivés de diverses espèces , et des dérivés des dérivés. On compose des mots de plusieurs racines pour exprimer les idées complexes. Ensuite on décline les substantifs, les adjectifs et les pronoms > par genres, par nombres et par cas; on conjugue les verbes par voix/, par modes, 'par temps, par nombres et par personnes, en employant de même des désinences et quelquefois des augmens...
Page vii - ... languages is not less universal, but in most of its bearings of a quality infinitely more refined. " The members of this race inherited, from the period of their earliest youth, endowments of exceeding richness, and with a system of unlimited composition and agglutination. Possessing much, they are...
Page vi - East, which should accompany, jiari passu, nay, sometimes surpass, the Greek in all those perfections of form which have been hitherto considered the exclusive property of the latter, and be adapted throughout to adjust the perennial strife between the Greek dialects, by enabling us to determine where each of them has preserved the purest and the oldest forms...
Page v - ... separated for ages, but bearing indubitable features of their family connection. In the treatment, indeed, of our European tongues a new epoch could not fail to open upon us in the discovery of another region in the world of language, namely the Sanscrit,* of which it has been demonstrated, that, in its grammatical constitution, it stands in the most intimate relation to the Greek, the Latin, the Germanic, &c. ; so that it has afforded, for the first time, a firm foundation for the comprehension...

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