A comparative view of the state and faculties of man with those of the animal world

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printed for J. Dodsley, 1798 - History - 239 pages
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Page 248 - THERE are many who have passed the age of youth and beauty ; who have resigned the pleasures of that smiling season ; who begin to decline into the vale of years, impaired in their health, depressed in their fortunes, sti-ipt of their friends, their children, and perhaps still more tender connexions. "What resource...
Page 47 - ... deformed, in some degree or other. Deformity is peculiar to the civilized part of mankind, and is almost always the work of our own hands. The superior strength, just proportion, and agility of savages, are entirely the effects of their hardy education, of their living mostly in the open air, and their limbs never having suffered any confinement.
Page 249 - ... who sweetened all the toils of life. Where then can the soul find refuge, but in the bosom of religion ? There she is admitted to those prospects of Providence and futurity, which alone can warm and fill the heart. I...
Page 250 - It might be expected, that humanity would prevent them from breaking into the last retreat of the unfortunate, who can no longer be objects of their envy or resentment ; and tearing from them their only remaining comfort.
Page 22 - A proper attention to this subject would enable us to improve not only the constitutions but the characters of our posterity. Yet we every day see very sensible people, who are anxiously attentive to preserve or improve the breed of their horses, tainting the blood of their children, and entailing on them not only the most loathsome diseases of the body, but madness, folly, and the most unworthy dispositions, and this too when they cannot plead being stimulated by necessity, or impelled by passion.'*...
Page 103 - ... and elegant fociety, and which can only be acquired by mixing with the world. The want of thefe is often an infuperable bar to the advancement of perfons of merit, and proves therefore a frequent fource of their difguft...
Page 279 - The philo. sopher contemplates the Deity in all those marks of wisdom and benignity diffused through the various works of nature. The devout man confines his views rather to his own particular connection .with the Deity, the many instances of his goodness he himself has experienced, and the many greater he still hopes for. This establishes a kind of intercourse, which often interests the heart and passions in the deepest manner. The devotional taste, like all other tastes...
Page 167 - But no sooner does the poet attempt to spread out this sentiment or description, and to deck it round and round with glittering ornaments, than the mind begins to fall from its high elevation ; the transport is over ; the beautiful may remain, but the sublime is gone.
Page 126 - ... of young people, and particularly of his own children. On the contrary he attends with delight to the gradual opening of the imagination and the dawn of reafon ; he enters by a fecret...
Page 166 - The main fecret of being fublime, is to fay great things in few, and in plain words : For every fuperfluous decoration degrades a fublime idea. The mind rifes and fwells, when a lofty defcription or fentiment is prefented to it, in its native form. But no fooner does the poet attempt to fpread out this fentiment or defcription, and to deck it round and round with glittering...

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