A Compend of History, from the Earliest Times: Comprehending a General View of the Present State of the World, with Respect to Civilization, Religion, and Government; and a Brief Dissertation on the Importance of Historical Knowledge

Front Cover
David Allinson, 1808 - History - 354 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 67 - Shall brotherly love and cordial affection never become universal; and peace never wave her white banner throughout the earth ? Is there no durable institution, founded in virtue, and permanent, as the eternal rules of justice! Is there no firm ground of hope ? no rock, on which truth and reason may build a fabric, that shall never fall ? Yes; there is a Kingdom: its foundations were laid of old : its king is the God of heaven : its law is perfect love : its dominions are wide, for they extend to...
Page 14 - Men suffer all their life long under the foolish superstition that they can be cheated. But it is as impossible for a man to be cheated by any one but himself as for a thing to be, and not to be, at the same time.
Page 26 - He was a mighty hunter before the Lord : wherefore it is said, "Even as Nimrod the mighty hunter before the Lord." And the beginning of his kingdom was Babel, and Erech, and Accad, and Calneh, in the land of Shinar.
Page 169 - ... the English history to the close of the period, which was to be the subject' of the present chapter. Arabia forms the southwest corner of Asia. It is a tract of country considerably more than a thousand miles square, and is peninsulated by the Persian Gulf on the east, and the Red Sea on the west. This great country is supposed to have been peopled originally by the family of Ishmael, the son of Abraham. Of Ishmael it was foretold, that he should be an archer, and that his hand should be against...
Page 20 - ... sufficient for our defence. But, as the king of Spain is of German extraction ; as he is a member and prince of the empire, by the territories which descend to him from his grandfather...
Page 59 - ... of the kingdom. Old Warwick, the king-maker, was then alive ; and queen Margaret could well fight the battles of her husband. The invincible spirit of the nation was often roused ; nor was it restored to tranquillity, without laying some stone in the national fabric, which was destined, for many ages, to resist the billows of time. In the period now before us, the reader of English history, will find his attention drawn to one of the most extraordinary civil wars, in which any nation was ever...
Page 156 - A dungeon horrible, on all sides round As one great furnace flam'd, yet from those flames No light, but rather darkness visible Serv'd only to discover sights of woe...
Page 83 - Redeemer shall, m his own time and way, show who is the blessed and only potentate, the King of kings and the Lord of lords.
Page 2 - As there exists no evidence of a higher antiquity, • so neither is it possible to fix the creation of the world, and the origin of the human race, in a much later period. The history and chronology of the Bible are liable to no charge of inconsistency.
Page 83 - These words were scarcely uttered, when the whole assembly melted into tears. The forlorn condition of that young and virtuous princess, expelled the royal palace of her father, and inhabiting a miserable cottage, in want and wretchedness, recalled to mind the dreadful vicissitudes of fortune, which had befallen Athens, once mistress of the sea, and sovereign of Greece, but deprived, in one fatal hour, of her ships, her walls and her strength ; and reduced from the pride of...

Bibliographic information