A Complete System of Astronomy, Volume 3

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G. Woodfall, 1808 - Astronomy
 

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Page 26 - January . February March . April May June July Auguft . . September Oftober . . November December . ARC.
Page 27 - We might then obtain an exact value, if the places of the Stars were not determined with the utmost accuracy...
Page 3 - In the tables of the snn, moon, and planets, the epochs have been hitherto given for the apogee; but as they must be taken for the perigee of comets, De la Caille proposed that, for the sake of uniformity, the same should be adopted for all the bodies.
Page 56 - IV VII IX X XI XIII XIV XV XX VI XXV XXVI XXVII XXVIII XXV.
Page 34 - MASON introduced eight more equations which MAYER had given in his Theory, but which he thought of too little consequence, or too uncertain, to be introduced into his Tables.
Page 243 - Heavenly Bodies : In Four Discourses preached before the University of Cambridge. With an Introduction, Notes, and an Appendix. By the Rev. S. Vince, AMFRS Plumian Professor of Astronomy, and Experimental Philosophy.
Page 75 - From the true observed longitude (L), subtract the sum (S) of all the inequalities (regard being had to their signs), and L- S= mean longitude. Or, we may find this longitude...
Page 24 - Place, chiefly from a series of more than three thousand two hundred observations made at Greenwich between the years 1765, 1792.
Page 29 - He suspected, therefore, that the epochs of 1801 and 1802 were too great in his Tables, but he did not then see the cause of the error.
Page 24 - ... also to determine the epochs of 1802 and 1825, or 1830, we may consider the above mentioned question resolved. It is true that we can only arrive at this by employing much time and labour, but as analysis has not yet afforded the solution, and is not likely to do it • This distinguished astronomer obtained the prize offered by the Board of Longitude at Paris in 1800 for the best Lunar Tables, and since that time he has been incessantly occupied in the improvement of that great work.

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