A Comprehensive Grammar of the Sinhalese Language: Adapted for the Use of English Readers and Prescribed for the Civil Service Examinations

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G.J.A. Skeen, 1891 - Sinhalese language - 516 pages
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Page 415 - When the nominatives are of different persons, the verb agrees with the first person in preference to the second, and with the second in preference to the third...
Page 1 - From the same cause also this renowned land became celebrated (under that name). By whatever means the monarch Sihabahu slew the " siho " (lion), from that feat, his sons and descendants are called " Sihala," (the lion slayers). This Lanka having been conquered by a Sihalo, from the circumstance also of its having been colonized by a Sihalo, it obtained the name of
Page 321 - It builds no nest of its own, but lays its eggs in the nests of other birds to be hatched by them.
Page 344 - These Prakrit dialects began to disappear about the tenth century of the Christian Era, gave to modern languages good number of words.
Page 296 - He reads very badly." 260. An adverb adds something to the meaning of a verb or adjective, but does not alter the meaning of the word itself. ' Writes badly,' means all that ' writes ' means, and 'badly
Page 411 - ... in the others. In Elliptical sentences the part to be supplied in one clause, although suggested by what is •expressed in the other, is not necessarily exactly the same in form. Moreover, contracted sentences or clauses are always co-ordinate ; an elliptical clause is usually a subordinate clause, the portion to be supplied being suggested by the principal clause.
Page 411 - Elliptical Sentences. 453 Elliptical sentences differ from contracted sentences in the following respect: — In contracted sentences a certain portion which is common to the sentences is expressed oiily once in one of them, and has to be repeated in the others. In elliptical sentences, the part to be supplied in one clause, although suggested by what is expressed in the other, is not necessarily exactly the same in form. Moreover, contracted sentences or clauses are always co-ordinate; an elliptical...
Page 67 - A common noun (Latin, communis, ' shared by several') is a word that is the name of each thing out of a class of things of the same kind, as horse, stone, city, or of any portion of a quantity of stuff of the same sort, as wheat, iron, water. A common noun is so called because the name belongs in common to all the individual things in the class, or to all the portions into which the whole quantity of stuff may be divided. A...
Page 344 - They acquired the Elu language with the utmost facility, it being then almost identical with their own, and enriched it by their writings, doubtless introducing into Elu new forms of words and idioms current in their several vernaculars. The language spoken by Vijaya and his...
Page 376 - But the scholar cannot but regret the disuse of the Elu or Sanskrit terms that might be employed, now gradually falling into oblivion. The every-day talk, particularly of natives acquainted with English, is too often a miserable conglomeration of Sinhalese, English, Portuguese, Dutch, and Tamil unintelligible in great part save to those familiar with the jargon. It should be the constant endeavor of the student, as far as practicable...

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