A Concise Guide to Teaching Latin Literature

Front Cover
Ronnie Ancona
University of Oklahoma Press, 2007 - Education - 112 pages
0 Reviews

Keeping teachers up to date on recent developments in Latin scholarship

Catullus, Horace, Ovid, Cicero, and Vergil are the official Advanced Placement Program Latin authors as well as standard reading for college and advanced secondary students of Latin. This book provides accessible information about recent scholarship on these authors to show how an awareness of current academic debates can enhance the teaching of their work.

This is the first book aimed specifically at keeping teachers up to date on recent developments in Latin scholarship. Edited by Ronnie Ancona, a classics scholar with expertise in pedagogy, it features contributions by established authorities on each of the five Latin authors. Each essay combines theoretical material with Latin passages so that instructors can see how practically to apply these methods to specific texts.

These contributions reveal many and varied ways to approach the reading and study of Latin texts while conveying the excitement of recent scholarship. A practical sourcebook for busy teachers who wish to keep abreast of current critical thought, A Concise Guide to Teaching Latin Literature contributes to the ongoing conversation between pedagogy and scholarship as it shows ways to broaden students’ appreciation of these timeless classics.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Contemporary Scholarship
21
Negotiating Critical Boundaries
53
Ciceronian Scholarship in the Latin Classroom
71
Copyright

1 other sections not shown

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2007)

Ronnie Ancona, Professor of Classics at Hunter College and the Graduate Center, CUNY, and Director of Hunter's Master's program in Latin Adolescent Education, is the author of Writing Passion: A Catullus Reader, Horace: Selected Odes and Satire 1.9, and Time and the Erotic in Horace's Odes.

Bibliographic information