A Course in Electrical Engineering, Volume 0

Front Cover
McGraw-Hill Book Company, Incorporated, 1920 - Electric engineering
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I was specifically looking for information on Edison NiFe batteries. Check out page 115-120 or so.
Good information.

Contents

Magnetic Induction
11
Law of the Magnetic Field
12
Other Forms of Magnets
13
Laminated Magnets
14
Magnetizing 22 Earths Magnetism
15
CHAPTER II
17
Relation of Magnetic Field to Current
18
Magnetic Field of Two Parallel Conductors
19
Magnetic Field of a Single Turn 27 The Solenoid
21
The Commercial Solenoid
22
The Horseshoe Solenoid
24
The Lifting Magnet
26
Magnetic Separator
27
CHAPTER III
31
Unit of Resistance
32
Specific Resistance or Resistivity
34
Volume Resistivity
35
Conductance
36
Resistances in Series and in Parallel
37
The Circular Mil
38
The Circularmilfoot
39
17
40
Temperature Coefficient of Resistance
41
Alloy3
43
The American Wire Gage A W G
44
22
45
Bare Concentric Lay Cables of Standard Annealed Copper English Units
46
CHAPTER IV
48
Nature of the Flow of Electricity
49
Difference of Potential
51
Measurement of Voltage and Current
52
Ohms Law
53
The Series Circuit
54
The Parallel Circuit
55
Division of Current in a Parallel Circuit
56
The Seriesparallel Circuit
58
Electrical Energy
60
Heat and Energy
61
Thermal Units
62
Potential Drop in Feeder Supplying One Concentrated Load
63
Potential Drop in Feeder Supplying Two Concentrated Loads at Different Points
64
Estimation of Feeders
65
Power Loss in a Feeder
67
CHAPTER V
68
Battery Resistance and Current
70
Batteries Receiving Energy
71
Battery Cells in Series
73
Seriesparallel Grouping of Cells
75
Grouping of Cells
76
KirchhofTs Laws
77
Applications of Kirchhoffs Laws
79
Assumed Direction of Current
81
Further Application of Kirchhoffs Laws
82
CHAPTER VI
84
Definitions
85
Primary Cells
86
Internal Resistance
87
Polarization
88
86A Daniell Cell
89
86B Gravity Cell
90
EdisonLalande Cell
91
Weston Standard Cell
92
Dry Cells
94
Storage Batteries
96
The Lead Cell
97
Faure or Pasted Plate
101
Charging
102
Stationary Batteries
103
Separators
104
Electrolyte
105
Specific Gravity
106
Installing and Removing from Service
107
Vehicle Batteries
108
Rating of Batteries
110
Battery Installations
114
The Nickelironalkaline Battery
115
Charging and Discharging
117
Applications
118
Electroplating
120
CHAPTER VII
122
The DArsonval Galvanometer
123
Galvanometer Shunts
126
Ammeters
128
Voltmeters
134
Multipliers or Extension Coils
135
Hotwire Instruments
136
Voltmeterammeter Method
137
The Voltmeter Method
139
The Wheatstone Bridge
141
The Slide Wire Bridge
144
The Murray Loop
147
The Varley Loop
148
Insulation Testing
150
The Potentiometer
153
The Leeds Northrup Low Resistance Potentiometer
155
Voltage Measurements with the Potentiometer
157
The Measurement of Current with Potentiometer
158
Measurement of Power
160
The Wattmeter
161
The Watthour Meter
162
Adjustment of the Watthour Meter
165
CHAPTER VIII
169
Ampereturns
170
Reluctance of the Magnetic Circuit
171
Permeability of Iron and Steel
173
Law of the Magnetic Circuit
174
Method of Trial and Error
175
Determination of Ampereturns
176
Use of the Magnetization Curves
178
Magnetic Calculations in Dynamos
179
CHAPTER IX
198
Electrostatic Induction
199
Electrostatic Lines
200
Capacitance
202
Specific Inductive Capacity or Dielectric Constant
204
Equivalent Capacitance of Condensers in Parallel
205
Equivalent Capacitance of Condensers in Series
206
Energy Stored in Condensers
208
Calculation of Capacitance
209
Measurement of Capacitance
211
Cable TestingLocation of a Total Disconnection
213
CHAPTER X
215
Direction of Induced Electromotive Force Flemings Right Hand Rule
218
Voltage Generated by the Revolution of a Coil
219
Grammering Winding
222
Drum Winding
223
Lap Winding
224
Lap WindingSeveral Coil Sides per Slot
229
Paths Through an Armature
230
Multiplex Windings
233
Equalizing Connections in Lap Windings
236
Wave Winding
238
Number of Brushes
243
Paths Through a Wave Winding
244
Uses of the Two Types of Windings
246
Frame and Cores
249
Field Cores and Shoes
250
The Armature
251
The Commutator
253
Field Coils
254
The Brushes
255
CHAPTER XI
257
The Saturation Curve
258
Hysteresis
260
Determination of the Saturation Curve
261
Field Resistance Line
262
Types of Generators
263
The Shunt Generator
264
Critical Field Resistance
265
Generator Fails to Build Up
266
Armature Reaction
267
Armature Reaction in Multipolar Machines
272
Compensating Armature Reaction
274
Commutation
276
The Electromotive Force of Selfinduction
281
Commutating Poles or Interpoles
285
The Shunt GeneratorCharacteristics
288
Generator Regulation
292
Total Characteristic
293
The Compound Generator
295
Effect of Speed
299
Determination of Series Turns Armature Characteristic
300
The Series Generator
301
Effect of Variable Speed Upon Characteristics
305
The Tirrill Regulator
306
CHAPTER XII
309
Force Developed with Conductor Carrying Current
310
Flemings Lefthand Rule
311
Torque
312
Torque Developed by a Motor
313
Counter Electromotive Force
316
Armature Reaction and Brush Position in a Motor
319
The Shunt Motor
321
The Series Motor
324
The Compound Motor
328
Motor Starters
329
Magnetic Blowouts
338
Speed Control
339
Railway Motor Control
345
Dynamic Braking
347
Motor TestingProny Brake
348
Measurement of Speed
353
CHAPTER XIII
355
Efficiency
359
Efficiencies of Motors and Generators
360
Measurement of Stray Power
361
Straypower Curves
363
Opposition TestKapps Method
365
Ratings and Heating
368
Parallel Running of Shunt Generators
372
Parallel Running of Compound Generators
374
Circuit Breakers
377
CHAPTER XIV
380
Voltage and Weight of Conductor
381
Size of Conductors
382
Distribution Voltage
383
Systems of Feeding
384
SeriesParallel System
385
Voltage Unbalancing
388
Twogenerator Method
390
Balancer Set
391
Threewire Generator
394
Feeders and Mains
395
Electric Railway Distribution
396
397
397
Central Station Batteries
399
Resistance Control
401
APPENDIX
407
Questions on Chapter II
413
Questions on Chapter IV
420
Problems on Chapter V
427
Problems on Chapter VI
434
Problems on Chapter VII
442
Problems on Chapter VIII
449
Questions on Chapter IX
455
Questions on Chapter XI
461
Questions on Chapter XII
467
Questions on Chapter XIII
474
Problems on Chapter XIV
480
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