A Course of English Reading: Adapted to Every Taste and Capacity : with Anecdotes of Men of Genius

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Carey & Hart, 1845 - Best books - 59 pages
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Page 13 - To the very moment that he bade me tell it : Wherein I spake of most disastrous chances, Of moving accidents, by flood, and field ; Of hair-breadth scapes i...
Page 63 - Visits to Remarkable Places : Old Halls, Battle-Fields, and Scenes illustrative of Striking Passages in English History and Poetry. By WILLIAM HOWITT. 2 vols. square crown 8vo. with Wood Engravings, 25s. The Rural Life of England.
Page 13 - Wherein of antres vast and deserts idle, Rough quarries, rocks, and hills whose heads touch heaven, It was my hint to speak, — such was the process: And of the Cannibals that each other eat, The Anthropophagi, and men whose heads Do grow beneath their shoulders.
Page 21 - In every work regard the writer's end, Since none can compass more than they intend; And if the means be just, the conduct true, Applause, in spite of trivial faults, is due.
Page 9 - We have all heard the remark, that one half the world does not know how the other half lives...
Page 6 - If a man begins to read in the middle of a book, and feels an inclination to go on, let him not quit it, to go to the beginning. He may perhaps not feel again the inclination.
Page 10 - The travellers into the East tell us that, when the ignorant inhabitants of those countries are asked concerning the ruins of stately edifices yet remaining amongst them, the melancholy monuments of their former grandeur and long-lost science, they always answer that they were built by magicians.
Page 6 - I myself have never persisted in any plan for two days together. A man ought to read just as inclination leads him ; for what he reads as a task will do him little good.
Page 53 - A Critical Commentary and Paraphrase on the Old and New Testament and the Apocrypha. By Patrick, Lowth, Arnald, Whitby, and Lowman.
Page 10 - Hudibras in prose. He has in his possession the common-place book, in which Butler reposited, not such events or precepts as are gathered by reading; but such remarks, similitudes, allusions, assemblages, or inferences, as occasion prompted, or meditation produced; those thoughts that were generated in his own mind, and might be usefully applied to some future purpose. Such is the labour of those who write for immortality.

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