A court in exile: Charles Edward Stuart and the romance of the Countess d'Albanie, Volume 1

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Hutchinson & Co., 1903 - Biography & Autobiography
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Page 59 - We saw nothing in him that looked like spirit. He never appeared with cheerfulness and vigour to animate us. Our men began to despise him ; some asked if he could speak. His countenance looked extremely heavy. He cared not to come abroad amongst us soldiers, or to see us handle our arms or do our exercise.
Page 65 - Albeit that here in London Town It is my fate to die; O carry me to Northumberland, In my father's grave to lie. There chant my solemn requiem In Hexham's holy towers; And let six maids of fair Tynedale Scatter my grave with flowers.
Page 304 - It was highly wrong to have set up the royal standard without having positive assurances from his Most Christian Majesty, that he would assist you with all his force ; and as your royal family lost the crown of these realms upon the account of France, the world did and had reason to expect that France would seize the first favourable opportunity to restore your august family.
Page 59 - I must not conceal, that when we saw the man whom they called our King, we found ourselves not at all animated by his presence, and if he was disappointed in us, we were tenfold more so in him. We saw nothing in him that looked like spirit. He never appeared with cheerfulness and vigour to animate us. Our men began to despise him ; some asked if he could speak.
Page 123 - I turned off into another alley, to reason at leisure on our several observations; there we met Dr. Cooper, and after making some turns with him, the same company came again in our way. I was grown somewhat bolder, and resolved to let them pass as before, in order to take a full view of the princess. She is of a middling stature, well-shaped, and has lovely features; wit, vivacity, and mildness of temper are painted in her looks.
Page 265 - ... his tortures, there lay such a swarm of mitches upon his face and hands as would have made any other but himself fall into despair, which, notwithstanding his incomparable patience, made him utter such hideous cries and complaints as would have rent the rocks with compassion.
Page 168 - Lochiel, who, my father has often told me, was our firmest friend, may stay at home, and learn from the newspapers the fate of his prince.'— ' No,' said Lochiel, 'I'll share the fate of my prince; and so shall every man over whom nature or fortune hath given me any power.
Page 201 - Soon as along the green he spied ^Eneas hastening to his side, With eager act both hands he spread, And bathed his cheeks with tears, and said : " At last ! and are you come at last? Has filial tenderness o'erpast Hard toil and peril sore? And may I hear that well-known tone, And speak in accents of my own, And see that face once more? Ah yes ! I knew the hour would come : I pondered o'er the days' long sum, Till anxious care the future knew : And now completion proves it true.

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