A Creel of Irish Stories

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Dodd, Mead, 1899 - Ireland - 318 pages
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Page 184 - come flourishin' in to her wid any ould thrifle of rubbish he might ha' picked up outside," whereas now he had kept this valuable property silently in his possession for three days, for the purpose of bestowing it upon the O'Mearas' slip of a girl. Consequently, Joe's mother held aloof from the eager group round the table, and uttered disparaging predictions of the event. Tom and Mary did make a prudent attempt to fend off their collision with the disappointment which might emerge from the mists...
Page 180 - And suppose it was sittin' on anybody's ould wall," said Tom, "what else except a one of them rowlin' waves set it sittin' there wid itself, and it all dhreepin' wet out of the say? Be the same token it's quare if one person hasn't got as good a right to be liftin
Page 174 - I got the chance to slit its bastely bellows for it, 'twould be apt to keep its huffin' and puffin' quiet for one while - it would so.' This was not, however, the limit of his losses. Presently he stood looking vexedly over the door of a half-roofed shed, which contained a good deal of seawater and weed; also a very small red calf, and a large jelly-fish. The calf was drowned dead, but the jelly-fish seemingly lived as much as usual. 'Eyah, get out wid you, you unnathural-lookin
Page 186 - She was decidedly out of humour, albeit by no means on account of the others' rapid reverse of fortune. Rather, we may apprehend, she had viewed that incident as a not regrettable check to a tide of affairs which was unduly sweeping all manner of good luck her neighbours' way, and unjustly leaving her high and dry. This grudging spirit had forbidden her to appear interested in the examination of the box, but now she could satisfy without betraying her curiosity.
Page 173 - Kennys, who, like most of their neighbours, at least half-believed that its recesses harboured a monstrous indweller. Their thin white house stood fronting the seashore, with a narrow grazing strip behind, while their yard and sheds lay along the dwindling isthmus, which becomes a mere reef-like bar of boulders and shingle before it again touches the mainland. In calm weather Joe Kenny might see his unimposing ricks reflected from ridge to butt, with gleams of ochre and amber and gold in both salt...
Page 183 - Norah, and we'll soon thry what it is at all." Norah, the elder sister, made a very long arm, and secured the tool with as little approximation as might be to the deep-set panes. She had neither sweetheart nor Christmas box, and was disposed to take a rather languid and cynical view of affairs. " There's apt not to be any great things in it, I'm thinkin'," said the widow Kenny from her elbowchair by the hearth.
Page 173 - Another murkier shadow brooded pyer it in the opinion of the Kennys, who, like most of their neighbours, at least half -believed that its recesses harboured a monstrous indweller. Their thin white house stood fronting the seashore, with a narrow grazing strip behind, while their yard and sheds lay along the dwindling isthmus, which...
Page 179 - Tom O'Meara, Rose's brother, who was generally recognised to be courting Mary Kenny, Joe's youngest sister. The O'Mearas lived a good step beyond the other end of the isthmus, and Joe had begun to speculate what so early a visit might signify, when the greater wonder abruptly swallowed the less as he became aware that Tom had the twice-lost box in his hands. " Look-a, Joe, at what I 'm after findin'," he called jubilantly. " Findin' ? Musha moyah ! that 's fine talkin',
Page 182 - This consarn's a prisi nt the two of us is after gettin' the two of yous — I mane it was Joe found it aquilly the same as me, that picked it up somethin' later. And it's he's givin' the whole of his half of the whole of it to Rose ; but he's nothin' to say to the rest of it ; and it's meself that's givin...
Page 177 - ... gift. He would be making over to Rose all the vague and wonderful possibilities of the treasure-trove, which in his imagination were more splendid than any better-defined object, as they loomed through a haze of unseen gold and jewels. Disappointment had scanty room among his forecasts. 'Sure, I'da right to give it to her just the way it is, wid anythin...

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