A critical pronouncing dictionary, and expositor of the English language: in which not only the meaning of every word is explained, and the sound of every syllable distinctly shown, but, where words are subject to different pronunciations, the reasons for each are duly considered, and the best pronunciation is selected

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Published by Benjamin Warner, and Thomas & William Bradford, 1822 - Reference - 413 pages
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Page viii - Il ya vingt (20) consonnes : b, c, d, f, g, h, j, k, 1, m, n, p, q, r, s, t, v, w, x, z.
Page xxii - The best and easiest rule," says the learned bishop, " for dividing the syllables in spelling, is, to divide them as they are naturally divided in a right pronunciation, without regard to the derivation of words, or the possible combination of consonants, at the beginning of a syllable.
Page vi - ... those who, from their elevated birth or station, give laws to the refinements and elegancies of a court ? To confine propriety to the latter, which is too often the case, seems an injury to the former ; who, from their very profession, appear to have a natural right to a share, at least, in the legislation of language, if not to an absolute sovereignty.
Page vii - ... now so many works of this kind, that the general current of custom, with respect to the sound of words, may be collected from them with almost as much certainty as the general sense of words from Johnson. An exhibition of the opinions of orthöepists about the sound of words always appeared to me a very rational method of determining what is called custom. This method I have adopted...
Page xiii - As emphasis evidently points out the most significant word in a sentence ; so, where other reasons do not forbid, the accent always dwells with greatest force on that part of the word which, from its importance, the hearer has always the greatest occasion to observe : and this is necessarily the root or body of the word.
Page vi - Graecism of the schools, will be denominated respectable usage, till a certain number of the general mass of speakers have 'acknowledged them ; nor will a multitude of common speakers authorise any pronunciation which is reprobated by tiie learned and polite. As those sounds, therefore, which are the most generally received among the learned and polite...
Page 22 - Apogason, apogee, or apogeum, " a point in the heavens, in which the sun, or a planet, is at the greatest distance possible from the earth in its whole revolution.
Page xxii - Dividing words into syllables is a very different operation, according to the different ends proposed by it. The object of syllabication may be, either to enable children to discover the sound of words they are unacquainted with, or to shew the etymology of a word, or to exhibit the exact pronunciation of it.
Page vi - ... have acknowledged them ; nor will a multitude of common speakers authorize," (to whom?) "any pronunciation which is reprobated by the learned and polite. As those sounds, therefore," he concludes, "which are the most generally received among the learned and polite ; as well as the bulk of speakers are the most legitimate...
Page vi - Is it the usage of the multitude of speakers, whether good or bad ? This has never been asserted by the most sanguine abettors of its authority. Is it the usage of the studious in schools and colleges, with those of the learned professions, or that of those who, from their elevated birth or station, give laws to the refinements and...

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