A Cup of Sweets that Can Never Cloy: Or, Delightful Tales for Good Children

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J. Harris, the corner of St. Paul's Church-Yard, 1814 - Children - 175 pages
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Page 91 - ... and he had soon an opportunity of doing what might have cost him his life, though it is to be hoped he was not quite wicked enough to desire it. Walking, one morning, by the side of the river, he begged Charles to get into a little boat, which lay close to the shore, to look for a sixpence, which he pretended to have left in it ; and began to sob and cry, because he was afraid he had lost his money. Charles, who was always glad to oblige his brother, jumped into the boat with the utmost readiness...
Page 87 - God would t love him, whilst he continued to behave well, just as much as if his skin were as white as theirs, and much more than he would either of them, unless they were equally deserving of his love, as black Ben had rendered himself by his good-natured and amiable disposition. ) ..'.'.) : '"•'• >' Edward and Charles both promised their papa that they would do every thing he desired, but they were not both equally sincere: JKtfward could with difficulty hide his joy, when his.
Page 33 - ... as he liked with it, without consulting anybody ; and having long had a great desire to amuse himself with some gunpowder, he began to think (now he was so rich) whether it might not be possible to contrive to get some. He had been often told of the dreadful accidents which have happened by playing with this dangerous thing, but he fancied he could take care, he was old enough to amuse himself with it, without any risk of hurting himself; and meeting with a boy who was employed about the house...
Page 31 - ... in his power : and no one could be more ready to lend his toys to his brothers and sisters, whenever they appeared to desire them : but the moment he was told not to stand so near the fire, or not to- jump down two or three stairs at a time, not to climb upon the tables, or to take care he did not fall out of the window, he grew directly angry, and asked if they thought he did not know what he was about — said he was no lo/nger a baby, and that he was certainly big enough to take care of himself.
Page 92 - Charles, who was always glad1 to oblige his brother, jumped into the boat with the utmost readiness,' but in an instant, the wicked Edward, having cut the rope by which it was fastened, away it went into the middle of the river, and no one can tell whither it might have been driven, or what terrible accident might have happened, if the wind had been high, and had not the good affectionate Ben stripped off his clothes, and plunged into the river, to go to Charles's assistance. Ben could...
Page 88 - Charles take out his handkerchief to wipe away his tears, when he was taking leave of his father, he pulled out his also : but it was not to wipe his eyes, but to hide his smiles ; for he was so happy at the thought of all the tricks he could play, without having any one to control him, that he was afraid his joy would be perceived, and his hypocrisy detected. Mrs Spencer's health was so indifferent, that she seldom quitted her apartment ; so that she knew very little of the behaviour of her sons.
Page 35 - ... got together in a corner, and the maid was fallen on the floor in a fit. It was very long before either Henry or his sister could speak, and many months before they were quite restored to health, and even then with the loss of one of poor Henry's eyes. He had been many weeks confined to his bed in a dark room, and it was during that time that he had reflected upon his past conduct : he now saw that he had been a very conceited, wrong-headed boy, and that children would avoid a great many accidents...
Page 34 - ... the others, some hurt, but all frightened almost to death, were got together in a corner, and the maid was fallen on the floor in a fit. It was very long before either Henry or his sister could speak, and many months before they were quite restored to health, and even then with the loss of one of poor Henry's eyes. He had been many weeks confined to his bed in a dark room, and it was during that time that he had reflected upon his past conduct: he now saw that he had been a very conceited, wrong-headed...
Page 89 - ... usually took his hat, and went out, without telling any one whither he was going, or when he should return. One day, when he was gone away in this manner, and Charles was quite alone, he went up stairs to his mamma, and asked her leave to take a walk in the fields ; and away he went, with his favorite dog, for he had no other company, and he said, " Come along, Ruby, let us take a ramble together ; my brother always quarrels and fights with me, but I know you will not, my poor Ruby : here, my...
Page 35 - ... accidents which happen to themselves, and the mischiefs they frequently lead others into, if they would listen to the advice of their elders, and not fancy they are capable of conducting themselves without being directed ; and he was so sorry for what he had done, and particularly for what he had made his dear little Emma suffer, that he never afterwards did the least thing without consulting his friends : and whenever he was told not to do a thing, though he had wished it ever so much, instead...

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