A Cup of Sweets that Can Never Cloy, Or Delightful Tales for Good Children

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J. Harris, 1818 - Children - 175 pages
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Page 93 - ... and cry, because he was afraid he had lost his money. Charles, who was always glad to oblige his brother, jumped into the boat with the utmost readiness ; but, in an instant, the wicked Edward having cut the rope by which it was fastened, away it went into the middle of the river, and no one can tell whither it might have been driven, or what terrible accident might have happened, if the wind had been high, and had not the good, affectionate Ben stripped off his clothes, and plunged into the...
Page 88 - Ben, and to recollect, that, though his face was black, lie was a very good boy, and that God would love him, whilst he continued to behave well, just as much as if his skin were as white as theirs, and much more than he would either of them, unless they were equally deserving of his love, as black Ben had rendered himself by his good-natured and amiable disposition. Edward and Charles both promised their papa that they would do every thing he desired, but they were not both equally sincere : Edward...
Page 89 - Edward could with difficulty hide his joy, when his papa told him he was going from home, for he was a very naughty boy, and had no inclination to obey any body, but to be his own master, and do as he liked, to get into all kinds of mischief, and kick and cuff poor Ben whenever he pleased. Thinking, however, it would be proper to appear sorry for what he was, in...
Page 40 - ... till the afternoon,) and had thrown a large basin of water all over her ; after which, wet as she was, she had been rummaging in a dirty closet, where she had no kind of business, and was, when her brother came into the nursery, covered with dust and cobwebs. Susan was called in haste to new dress her ; but she was so extremely careless of her clothes, and tore them so much every day, that one person was scarcely sufficient to keep them in order for her. Not a frock was to be found which had...
Page 36 - ... the others, some hurt, but all frightened almost to death, were got together in a corner, and the maid was fallen on the floor in a fit. It was very long before either Henry or his sister could speak, and many months before they were quite restored to health, and even then with the loss of one of poor Henry's eyes. He had been many weeks confined to his bed in a dark room, and it was during that time that he had reflected upon his past conduct: he now saw that he had been a very conceited, wrong-headed...
Page 95 - ... telling him of every thing which had passed in his absence. # Mr. Spencer now recollected that he had been much to blame in keeping his sons at home, and determined to send them both to school immediately. He observed, however, that they were not equally deserving of kindness and indulgence...
Page 90 - Thinking, however, it would be proper to appear sorry for what he was, in reality, extremely glad, and seeing poor Charles take out his handkerchief to wipe away his tears, when he was taking leave of his father, he pulled out his also : but it was not to wipe his eyes, but to hide his smiles ; for he was so happy at the thought of all the tricks he could play, without having any one to control him, that he was afraid his joy would be perceived, and his hypocrisy detected.
Page 90 - Mrs Spencer's health was so indifferent, that she seldom quitted her apartment ; so that she knew very little of the behaviour of her sons. Edward, as soon as he had breakfasted, usually took his hat, and went out, without telling any one whither he was going, or when he should return. One day, when he was gone away in this manner, and Charles was quite alone, he went up stairs to his mamma, and asked her leave to take a walk in the fields ; and away he went, with his favorite dog, for he had no...
Page 95 - Day, and his Father bought him a little pony, that he might ride about the park ; and he always let poor Ben have a ride with him, for he loved him very much. And Ben, who was a grateful, kind-hearted boy, did not forget how many times Charles had...
Page 35 - ... with some gunpowder, he began to think (now he was so rich) whether it might not be possible to contrive to get some. He had been often told of the dreadful accidents which have happened by playing with this dangerous thing, but he fancied he could take care, he was old enough to amuse himself with it, without any risk of hurting himself; and meeting with a boy who was employed about the house by the servants, he offered to give him a shilling for his trouble, if he would get him what he desired...

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