A cyclopeadia of the natural sciences

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Richard Griffin, 1858 - Nature - 613 pages
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Page 43 - ... and when that diligent bird has at length taken a fish, and is bearing it to his nest for the support of his mate and young ones, the bald eagle pursues him and takes it from him. With all this injustice he is never in good case; but, like those among men who live by sharping and robbing, he is generally poor, and often very lousy.
Page 43 - I wish the bald eagle had not been chosen as the representative of our country ; he is a bird of bad moral character ; he does not get his living honestly...
Page 456 - The base consists of an extensive and rather convex platform of sticks firmly interwoven, on the centre of which the bower itself is built : this, like the platform on which it is placed, and with which it is interwoven, is formed of sticks and twigs, but of a more slender and flexible description, the tips of the twigs being so arranged as to curve inwards and nearly meet at the top: in the interior the materials are so placed that the forks of the twigs are always presented outwards, by which arrangement...
Page 43 - ... for the support of his mate and young ones, the bald eagle pursues him and takes it from him. With all this injustice, he is never in good case but like those among men who live by sharping and robbing he is generally poor and often very lousy. Besides he is a rank coward: the little king bird not bigger than a sparrow attacks him boldly and drives him out of the district.
Page 357 - ... movements, the animation of his eye, and the intelligence he displays in listening and laying up lessons from almost every species of the feathered creation within his hearing, are really surprising, and mark the peculiarity of his genius.
Page 287 - Behold he drinketh up a river, and hasteth not: he trusteth that he can draw up Jordan into his mouth. He taketh it with his eyes: his nose pierceth through snares.
Page 226 - To the head of a Lizard, it united the teeth of a Crocodile ; a neck of enormous length, resembling the body of a Serpent : a trunk and tail having the proportions of an ordinary quadruped, the ribs of a Chameleon, and the paddles of a Whale.
Page 453 - It is fond of caresses, and offers its head and neck to be stroked ; and, if once accustomed to these familiarities, it becomes troublesome, and will not be satisfied without continual fondling. It makes its appearance as often as its master sits down to table, and begins with driving out the dogs and cats...
Page 404 - That carefully suspended gourd contains oil, which he has extracted from the fruit of another species ; and that long elastic plaited cylinder used for squeezing dry the mandiocca pulp to make his bread, is made of the bark of one of the singular climbing palms, which alone can resist for a considerable time the action of the poisonous juice. In each of these cases a species is selected better adapted than the rest for the peculiar purpose to which it is applied, and often having several different...
Page 103 - I am black, but comely, 0 ye daughters of Jerusalem, As the tents of Kedar, As the curtains of Solomon. Look not upon me, because I am black, Because the sun hath looked upon me: My mother's children were angry with me; They made me the keeper of the vineyards; But mine own vineyard have I not kept.

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