A Day at Laguerre's and Other Days: Being Nine Sketches

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Houghton, Mifflin, 1899 - 190 pages
 

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Page 154 - Men crowded about him and caught at his hands. Women sank on their knees, and hugged their children, and a sudden peace and stillness possessed every soul on board. Tearing a life-preserver from the man nearest him and throwing it overboard, he backed the coward ahead of him through the swaying mob, ordering the people to stand clear, and forcing the whole mass to the starboard side. The increased weight gradually righted the stricken boat until she regained a nearly even keel. With a threat to throw...
Page 7 - If you met him at the railway station opposite you would say, " A French professor returning to his school. ' ' Both of these surmises are partly wrong, and both partly right. Monsieur Laguerre has had a history. One can see by the deep lines in his forehead and by the firm set of his eyes and mouth that it has been an eventful one. His wife is a few years his junior, short and stout, and thoroughly French down to the very toes of her felt slippers. She is devoted to Francois and Lucette, the best...
Page 153 - The disabled boat careened from the shock and fell over on her beam helpless. Into the V-shaped gash the water poured a torrent. It seemed but a question of minutes before she would lunge headlong below the ice. Within two hundred yards of both boats, and free of the heaviest ice, steamed the wrecking tug Reliance of the Off-Shore Wrecking Company, making her way cautiously up the New Jersey shore to coal at Weehawken.
Page 182 - You mean before the scheme started?" "Scheme or swindle, either way, zur. Perhaps you know Mr. Isaac Hoyle?" I expressed my ignorance. "Or have heard of the Squantico Land and Improvement Company?" I was equally at fault, except what I had learned through Mrs. Jarvis. "Then, zur, you are in no way connected with the gang of scoundrels who would rob us of our homes?
Page 155 - Another mattress, quick ! All gone ? A blanket, then — carpet — anything — five minutes more and she '11 right herself ! Quick, for God's sake! " It was useless. Everything, even to the oilrags, had been used. " Your coat, then ! Think of the babies, man! Do you hear them...
Page 1 - A DAY AT LAGUERRE'S IT is the most delightful of French inns, in the quaintest of French settlements. As you rush by in one of the innumerable trains that pass it daily, you may catch glimpses of tall trees trailing their branches in the still stream, — hardly a dozen yards wide, — of flocks of white ducks paddling together, and of queer punts drawn up on the shelving shore or tied to soggy, patched-up landing-stairs. If the sun shines, you can see, now and then, between the trees, a figure kneeling...
Page 153 - January, when the ice in the Hudson River ran unusually heavy, a Hoboken ferry-boat slowly crunched her way through the floating floes, until the thickness of the pack choked her paddles in mid-river. The weather had been bitterly cold for weeks, and the keen northwest wind had blown the great fields of floating ice into a hard pack along the New York Shore. It was an early morning trip, and the decks were crowded with laboring men and the driveways choked with teams; the women and the children standing...
Page 156 - ... he had so carefully built up, and, before the engineer could protest, had forced his own body into the gap with his arm outside level with the drifting ice. An hour later the disabled ferry-boat, with every soul on board, was towed into the Hoboken slip. When they lifted the captain from the wreck he was unconscious and barely alive. The water had frozen his blood, and the floating ice had torn the...
Page 28 - Lazy red - sailed luggers, melon - loaded, with crinkled green shadows crawling beneath their bows ; while at the far end over the glistening highway, beaded with people, curves the beautiful bridge — an ivory arch against a turquoise sky. Espero ran the gauntlet of the skimming boats, dodging the little steamers puffing away all out of breath with their run from the Lido, shot his boat into a narrow canal, and out again upon the broad water, until the edge of her steel blade touched the water-stairs...
Page 154 - ... of his own boat, and before the astonished pilot could catch his breath ran the nose of the Reliance along the rail of the ferry-boat and dropped upon the latter's deck like a cat. If he had fallen from a passing cloud the effect could not have been more startling. Men crowded about him and caught his hands. Women sank on their knees and hugged their children, and a sudden peace and stillness possessed every soul on board. Tearing a life-preserver from the man nearest him and throwing it overboard,...

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