A Deep Waterway from the Great Lakes to the Gulf of Mexico: Papers Before the Western Society of Engineers

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Page 70 - ... be managed except under naturally favorable conditions, and it demands more attention than it is likely to receive at the hands of the amateur. Trout culture is in active progress all over the land, and there are numerous commercial trout culturists from whom fry and yearlings may be purchased. Brown trout and rainbow trout, it should be stated, are more suitable for small lakes than brook trout, and will stand warmer water and...
Page 81 - CECIL H. GREEN LIBRARY STANFORD UNIVERSITY LIBRAR STANFORD, CALIFORNIA 94305(650) 723-1493 grncirc@sulmail.stanford.edu All books are subject to recall. DATE DUE...
Page 3 - ... the general meetings of the societies of engineers of the nation. The site for the reservoirs to control the necessary flow of water during the freshet seasons, and for use later during the dry season of the year in maintaining the depth of the Mississippi, would be largely the unreclaimed lands in the St. Francis basin. It is proposed to divide up this basin by a series of cross levees, so that flood water may be impounded by a series of moderate earth embankments, and the rupture of one of...
Page 32 - ... Cairo gauge, or altogether above the sand movement in the bed of the river: and they should have a range of some 10 or 15 feet in their adjustable crests, fitting them both to fill the reservoirs from the flood periods of any year, or to draw off the extreme excesses of the occasional great flood. Without the topography of this basin the capacity of such a reservoir system can, of course, only be roughly estimated. But, covering 160 as it does an area of some 4,000 square miles, or about two-thirds...
Page 56 - It is my conviction that a deep waterway across the State of Illinois would be worth all it could possibly cost, within the limits of the most liberal estimates which have ever been placed upon it, even were there no Mississippi to receive its affluent waters, and no hope of ever floating a craft beyond the line which limits the sovereignty of the commonwealth.
Page 39 - ... be admitted that, perhaps, it could not have gotten this experience any cheaper. But, in any event, if the matter was worth beginning it is certainly now worth finishing with such a waterway in sight, carrying as it does this high degree of flood and bank protection with it. The final question then...
Page 34 - ... of these lower floods with a complete restraint from above, that no levee system yet considered would begin to stand against.
Page 27 - ... from 4 to 6 feet— and this notwithstanding the fact that a good part of the St. Francis basin...
Page 29 - But the question does not stand alone ; considering the increasing risk that each additional foot to the high water stages throws upon all the land behind the levees along the whole valley, there is very little doubt that holding the flood waters back, once for all, at the head of the system and never having extreme floods is true flood protection, even if it does sacrifice some 1 3 per cent of swamp area.
Page 27 - That the basins can not hold this flood water back for the low water period is plain ; from ten days to two weeks is about the retardation of each of them, and in a flood period of months it must practically all come out again on it. But even where it comes out, this reservoir system has considerably cut down...

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