A Defence of the Church of England Against Disestablishment

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Macmillan, 1888 - Church and state - 381 pages
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Page 355 - Therefore will we not fear, though the earth be moved, and though the hills be carried into the midst of the sea.
Page 384 - A GENERAL SURVEY OF THE HISTORY OF THE CANON OF THE NEW TESTAMENT DURING THE fIRST FOUR CENTURIES. Fourth Edition. With Preface on "Supernatural Religion.
Page 34 - Majesty the chief government, by which Titles we understand the minds of some slanderous folks to be offended ; we give not to our Princes the ministering either of God's Word, or of the Sacraments...
Page 383 - Wright.— THE BIBLE WORD-BOOK : A Glossary of Archaic Words and Phrases in the Authorised Version of the Bible and the Book of Common Prayer. By W. ALDIS WRIGHT, MA, Fellow and Bursar of Trinity College, Cambridge.
Page 15 - Concerning appeals, if any shall arise, they ought to proceed from the archdeacon to the bishop, and from the bishop to the archbishop : and, if the archbishop shall fail in doing justice, the cause shall at last be brought to our lord the king...
Page 384 - THE BIBLE IN THE CHURCH. A Popular Account of the Collection and Reception of the Holy Scriptures in the Christian Churches.
Page 133 - ... which were called arbitrary consecrations of tithes ; or he might pay them into the hands of the bishop, who distributed among his diocesan clergy the revenues of the church, which were then in common b.
Page 384 - Christ and other Masters. A Historical Inquiry into some of the Chief Parallelisms and Contrasts between Christianity and the Religious Systems of the Ancient World.
Page 34 - VI, which is, and was of ancient time due to the imperial crown of this realm, that is, under God to have the sovereignty and rule over all manner of persons born within these her realms, dominions, and countries , of what estate, either ecclesiastical or temporal, soever they be, so as no other foreign power shall or ought to have any superiority over them.
Page 22 - England, and of all his realm, hath ordered and established, that the free elections of archbishops, bishops, and all other dignities and benefices elective in England, shall hold from henceforth in the manner as they were granted by the king's progenitors, and the ancestors of other lords, founders of the said dignities and other benefices.

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