A Defence of the New-England Charters, Volume 1, Issue 1

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J. Almon, 1765 - New England - 88 pages
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Page 67 - Parliament made or to be made in the United Kingdom, so far as such Act shall relate to and mention the said Possessions, are and shall be null and void to all Intents and Purposes whatsoever...
Page 86 - For my part I am resolved to contend for the liberty delivered down to me by my ancestors; but whether I shall do it effectually or not, depends on you, my countrymen. "How little soever one is able to write, yet when the liberties of one's country are threatened, it is still more difficult to be silent.
Page 33 - Engineer, at the countries' expense, and is called Castle William. It is a Quarre surrounded with a covered way and joined with two lines of communication from the main battery, as also a line of communication from the main gate to a redoubt, which is to prevent the landing. It is well situated near the channel to hinder ships from coming up to the town, which must all come within pistol shot of this Battery. It is mounted with 100 pieces of cannon, several of which are placed...
Page 70 - Infant Colonies to prevent their shaking off the British Yoke. Besides, they are so distinct from one another in their Forms of Government, in their Religious Rites, in their Emulation of Trade, and consequently in their Affections, that they can never be suppos'd to unite in so dangerous an Enterprize.
Page 46 - the governor, with four or five ftrangers of his council, aeri . men of defperate fortunes, and bad, if any, principles, made •what laws, and levied what taxes they pleafed on the people. They, without an aflembly, raifed a penny in the pound on all eftates in the country, and two pence on all imported goods, befides twenty pence per head, as poll-money, and immoderate excife on wine, rum, and other liquors. Several •worthy perfons having, in an humble addrefs, reprefented this proceeding as...
Page 48 - ... THESE Proceedings, however Arbitrary and Oppressive, were but the Prelude : The Catastrophe was, if possible, yet more dismal. Having invaded their Liberties, by an easy Transition the next Attack was directly on their Properties. Their Title to their Lands was absolutely deny'd by the Governour and his Creatures upon two Pretences : One, that their Conveyances were not according to the Law of England ; the Other, that if they might be thought to have had something like a Title formerly, yet...
Page 33 - Castk of the appearance of any ships acd their number. The Castle again warns the town, and, if there be five ships or more, in time of war, an alarm is given to all the adjacent countries by firing a beacon. The province has...
Page 44 - For the quicker Dispatch of Causes, Declarations are made Parts of the Writ, in which the Case is fully and particularly set forth. If it be matter of Account, the Account is annex'd to the Writ, and Copies of both left with the Defendant ; which being done Fourteen Days before the Sitting of the Court, he is oblig'd to plead directly, and the Issue is then try'd. Whereas by the Practice of the Court of King's Bench, Three or Four Months Time is often lost after the Writ is serv'd, before the Cause...
Page 43 - Issue is always given, and special Matters brought in Evidence ; which saves Time and Expence ; and in this Case a Man is not liable to lose his Estate for a Defect in Form, nor is the Merit of the Cause made to depend on the Niceties of Clerkship. By a Law of the Country no Writ may be abated for a circumstantial Error, such as a slight Mis-nomer or any Informality. And by another Law, it is enacted, that every Attorney taking out a Writ from the Clerk's Office...
Page 67 - ín any wife repugnant to the before mentioned laws, or any of them, fo far as they do relate to the faid plantations, or any of them, or which are any ways repugnant to this prefent act, or to any other law hereafter to be made in this kingdom, fo far as fuch law fhall relate to and mention the faid plantations, are illegal, null and void, to all intents and purpofcs whatfoever.

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