A Defence of the System of Solitary Confinement of Prisoners Adopted by the State of Pennsylvania: With Remarks on the Origin, Progress and Extension of this Species of Prison Discipline

Front Cover
Published in 1829--republished by order of the Philadelphia Society for Alleviating the Miseries of Public Prisons. E.G. Dorsey, printer, 16 Library Street, 1833 - Prison discipline - 104 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 22 - States,} are enormous solid buttresses, diminishing in offsets, and terminating in pinnacles. A lofty octangular tower, 80 feet high, containing an alarm bell and clock, surmounts this entrance, and forms a picturesque proportional centre. On each side of this main building, (which contains the apartments of the warden, keepers, domestics, &c.) are screen wing walls, which appear to constitute portions of the main edifice ; they are pierced with small blank pointed windows, and are surmounted by...
Page 21 - The design and execution impart a grave, severe, and awful character to the external aspect of this building. The effect which it produces on the imagination of every passing spectator, is peculiarly impressive, solemn, and instructive. The architecture is in keeping with the design. The broad masses, the small and well proportioned apertures, the continuity of lines, and the bold and expressive simplicity which characterize the features of the facade, are most happily and judiciously combined.
Page 10 - In the preamble of this act (which passed the legislature), a conviction was expressed, that ' if many offenders convicted of crimes for which transportation has been usually inflicted, were ordered to solitary confinement, accompanied by well regulated labour and religious instruction, it might be the means, under Providence, not only of deterring others from the commission of the like crimes, but also of reforming the individuals and inuring them to habits of industry.
Page 22 - The central building is 200 feet in length, consists of two projecting massive square towers, 50 feet high, crowned by projecting embattled parapets, supported by pointed arches, resting on corbels or brackets. The pointed, munnioned windows in these towers, contribute in a high degree to their picturesque effect. The curtain between the towers is 41 feet high, and is finished with a parapet and embrasures.
Page 47 - Whereas if many offenders convicted of crimes for which transportation has been usually inflicted, were ordered to solitary imprisonment, accompanied by well-regulated labour and religious instruction, it might be the means, under Providence, not only of deterring others from the commission of the like crimes, but also of reforming individuals and inuring them to habits of industry.
Page 22 - ... feet in height ; the basement or belting course, which is 10 feet high, is scarped, and extends uniformly the whole length. The...
Page 22 - The curtain between the towersis 41 feet high, and is finished with a parapet and embrasures. The pointed windows in it are very lofty and narrow. The great gateway in the centre is a very conspicuous feature ; it is 27 feet high, and...
Page 101 - It is a mistake to believe that the inmates of prisons are a set of outlaws and tiger-like beings, lost to all good in this world, and without hope of an hereafter. Too many, (indeed most of them,) on first convictions, are either neglected youths thrown into the world without education and without friends, (often the victims of hard masters,) or ignorant men, the dupes of artful knaves who know how to elude detection. Neglect of early education, the use of ardent spirits, gambling and dealing in...
Page 23 - A novel and ingenious contrivance in each cell, which has been frequently described, prevents the possibility of conversation, preserves the purity of the atmosphere of the cells, and dispenses with the otherwise unavoidable necessity of leaving the apartment, except when the regulations permit : flues conduct heated air from large cockle stoves to the cells. Light is admitted by a large circular glass in the crown of the arch, which is raking, and the highest part 16 feet 6 inches above the floor,...
Page 99 - The circumstance, indeed, of being withdrawn from the influence of the severer atmospheric vicissitudes, such as wet and cold, which are prolific sources of disease with a large portion of the community, would, of itself, more than compensate for the operation of any unfavourable causes to health, experienced in this prison. But, when it is considered, that many of the individuals sent to our prisons, have been in previous habits of drunkenness and debauchery, the comparative healthfulness of the...

Bibliographic information