A Descriptive Catalogue of Indian Produce Contributed to the Amsterdam Exhibition, 1883

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Superintendant of Government Printing, 1883 - International Exhibition - 190 pages
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Page 125 - Indian shawls bore an extravagant price, and purchasers could always distinguish them by their odor ; in fact, they were perfumed with patchouly. The French manufacturers had for some time successfully imitated the Indian fabric, but could not impart the odor.
Page 112 - Unlike most other tonics, it does not constipate the bowels, but tends to produce a regular action of the alimentary canal, even in those subject to habitual constipation. During its use the bile becomes more abundant and healthy in character. The tendency to excess of acidity in the stomach, with disengagement of flatus, is much restrained by its use. These qualities fit it in a most peculiar degree for the kind of indigestion which occurs in gouty persons. It may, when necessary, be associated...
Page 150 - India it is used for all purposes of house and ship-building, for bridges, sleepers, furniture, and most other purposes. The leaves give a red dye; they are very large, and are used as plates, for packing, aud for thatching. An oil is extracted from the wood in Burma and is used medicinally as a substitute for linseed oil and as a varnish".
Page 125 - French manufacturers got into the way of importing the plant to perfume articles of their own make, and thus palm off home-spun shawls for real Indian. The Arabs use and export it more than any other nation. Their annual pilgrim ships take up an immense quantity of the leaf ; they use it principally for stuffing mattresses and pillows, and assert that it is very efficacious in preventing contagion and prolonging life. The characteristic smell of Chinese and Indian ink is owing to an admixture of...
Page 88 - ... apex, broadly cordate at base, repand-dentate; pedicels much shorter than the leaves; umbellets capitate, 2 to 4-flowered, subtended by 2 ovate bracts; flowers pink, nearly sessile; fruit prominently ribbed and reticulated. A plant growing in wet shady places, widely spread in warm countries. In India the leaves, which are bitter, are toasted and given in infusion to children in bowel complaints and fevers, and they are applied as a remedy for bruises to check inflammation. On the Malabar coast...
Page 2 - The bark has a pleasant and slightly bitter taste, and is given in cases of dyspepsia, and is considered a tonic and febrifuge.
Page 16 - Beliew 22 states that in Afghanistan, as throughout India, a strong decoction is given as a vermifuge, and a weak one to children in measles. He also mentions that an infusion of any of the Artemesias is given as a tonic. In Sind and Persia, Artemisia vahliana also furnishes a tonic, febrifuge, and vermifuge.
Page 20 - OF all the fibre-yielding plants known to botanical science there is not one so well calculated to meet the pressing requirements of the Paper -trade as "BAMBOO," both as regards facility and economy of production, as well as the quality of the
Page 112 - As a remedy against the languor and debility which affect many persons in summer and autumn, nothing is equal to the cold infusion of this plant. It may be taken twice or even more frequently daily for a considerable time ; then discontinued, and afterwards resumed. Children take it more readily than most other bitters. It is found to be a very efficacious remedy in India against intermittents, particularly when associated with Guilandina, Bonduc, or Caranga nuts. The debility which is apt to end...
Page 112 - Chiretta possesses the general properties of bitter tonics, but has at the same time some peculiar to itself, which fit it well for certain forms and complications of disease. Unlike most other tonics, it does not constipate the bowels, but tends to produce a regular action of the alimentary canal, even in those subject to habitual constipation. During its use the bile becomes more abundant and healthy in character. The tendency to excess of acidity in the stomach, with disengagement of flatus, is...

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