A descriptive catalogue of the lace and embroidery in the South Kensington museum, Volume 1

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Page 131 - ANTIQUE POINT AND HONITON LACE. Containing Plain and Explicit Instructions for Making, Transferring, and Cleaning Laces of every Description, with about One Hundred Illustrations, Outlines, and Pricking of the Principal Point Stitches and Honiton Sprigs. By Mrs.
Page 35 - This branch of industry, in which above 60,000 people were employed at the beginning of the present century, has greatly declined in the mountain district of the Erzgebirge, both on the Saxon and Bohemian sides, the peasants only making the coarse " torchon " lace. Machinemade lace has quite supplanted the hand-made, but great efforts have been lately made to revive the industry. Lace-making is supposed to have been introduced into Denmark by queen Elizabeth, sister of the emperor Charles V., and...
Page 150 - Wednesdays, Thursdays, and Fridays, from 10 AM till 4, 5, or 6 PM, according to the season.
Page 41 - The special excellence of Lille lace is its single ground ; the finest, lightest, and most transparent known. Instead of the sides of the meshes being plaited, either partly as in Brussels or wholly as in Valenciennes, four of the sides are formed by twisting two threads round each other, and the remaining two sides by the simple crossing of the threads over each other. A thick thread marks the pattern. The edges of the old Lille lace are generally straight. The black was much worn for mantles, but...
Page 126 - Arranged to meet the requirements of the Syllabus of the Science and Art Department of the Committee of Council on Education, South Kensington.
Page 10 - Lace has two edges : the upper, called ' pearl ' or ' picot/ consists of a row of little points at equal distances, forming a kind of fringe to the edge ; and the lower or ' footing,' a narrow lace that serves to strengthen the ground and to sew the lace to the material upon which it is to be worn. " Lace is divided into two classes, point and pillow. Point is made with a needle on a parchment pattern ; pillow by the weaving, twisting, and plaiting of the threads with bobbins, upon the well-known...
Page 35 - ... beginning of the present century, has greatly declined in the mountain district of the Erzgebirge, both on the Saxon and Bohemian sides, the peasants only making the coarse " torchon " lace. Machinemade lace has quite supplanted the hand-made, but great efforts have been lately made to revive the industry. Lace-making is supposed to have been introduced into Denmark by queen Elizabeth, sister of the emperor Charles V., and wife of Christian II., but it has never been established as a manufacture...
Page 127 - W. This work contains the whole of the series of articles on Antique Point Lace which have been published in " The Queen." It will prove an invaluable guide and book of reference to ladies interested in Antique Lace, and, with its highly ornamental embossed cover, will form a handsome ornament...
Page 63 - Universal Art Inventory consisting of brief notes of Works of Fine and Ornamental Art executed before ad 1800, chiefly to be found in Europe, especially in connexion with Architecture, and for the most part existing in Ecclesiastical Buildings : compiled for the use of South Kensington Museum and the Schools of Art in the United Kingdom.
Page xxv - ... stitched to a piece of coarse linen folded double. The outline of the pattern is traced out by two threads fixed by small stitches, passed with another thread and needle, through the parchment and its linen lining. When the outline is finished the piece is given over to another worker to make the ground, which is worked backwards and forwards at right angles to the border. The flowers are next worked in ; then follow the " modes " or " fillings," and other different operations.

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