A Descriptive Catalogue of the Specimens in the Mortimer Museum of Archæology and Geology at Driffield

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Page 76 - On the ancient Flint Implements of Yorkshire, and the Modern Fabrication of similar specimens,
Page 10 - The combined energies of these gentlemen would, I believe, obtain from the same area quite three times the large number of stone, flint, and bronze tools and weapons that have been collected by my brother and myself, now exhibited in the Museum at Driffield. If this be the case it should be asked, What has become of so great a number? In attempting to answer the question I will briefly refer to each collector's labours. (1.) The late Edward Tindall, of Bridlington, not only commenced to collect more...
Page 13 - ... last few years, almost the only local collectors I have had to compete with are Mr. Thomas Boynton, Bridlington Quay ; Mr. Robert Gatenby, Old Bridlington ; and, I may add, Sir Tatton Sykes, Bart., of Sledmere. COLLECTIONS FROM THE BARROWS. Hitherto I have only referred to the collections of specimens which have been obtained from the surface of the land, or otherwise accidentally found. In addition to these, four valuable collections of ancient British and Anglo-Saxon relics have been obtained...
Page 12 - Chadwick, late of Malton, who emigrated to New Zealand in 1895, was a very energetic collector of both fossils and implements. His business occupation brought him frequently among the farm labourers and quarrymen in the rural districts. This gave him exceptional opportunities for obtaining a considerable quantity of specimens, and for a considerable time he was my most active rival. That Mr. Chadwick made good use of these facilities, the contents of the Malton Museum give ample proof.
Page 9 - They constanthi visited the district, and not infrequently bought from the very field labourers whom we had trained to distinguish these specimens, by overbidding us, and so running up the prices. The combined energies of these gentlemen would, I believe, obtain from the same area quite three times the large number of stone, flint, and bronze tools and weapons that have been collected by my brother and myself, now exhibited in the Museum at Driffield. If this be the case it should be asked...
Page 76 - Owen) from the Nummulitic Eocene of the Mokattam cliffs, near Cairo, 100. R. Pinchin. — A short description of the Geology of part of the eastern province of the colony of the Cape of the Good Hope, 106. Ch. Gould. — Note upon a recent discovery of Tin-ore in Tasmania, 109. R. Mortimer. — An account of a well-section in the Chalk at the north-end of Driffield, East Yorkshire, 111. 0. Ward. — On Slickensides or Rock-striations, particulary those of the Chalk, 113. Inde. Calcutta. Geological...
Page 10 - The Rev. Canon Greenwell, of Durham, amassed a large number of valuable specimens (independently of those he obtained from his excavations of the barrows), the greater number of which have been gathered from the surface of the wold hills and the immediate neighbourhood. These the Canon sold in July, 1896, to Dr. Sturge, of Nice, and they are now in the south of France, to the great loss of East Yorkshire.
Page 5 - THE notes contained in the following pages have been put together in the hope that they may be of value to students of local archaeology and geology, not only by enumerating the various specimens gathered together in Mr.
Page 11 - Malton, was, like Mr. Edson, constantly being brought into contact with the farm servants and other field labourers, when on his business journeys in this neighbourhood, most of whom had then become well skilled in distinguishing the value of different specimens. They were also quite ready to take advantage of the extra prices to be obta1ned from the rival purchasers then in the market.
Page 14 - I have in addition a full type-written description of the results of all my excavations ; and I may say that the procuring and arranging of this collection has been one of the greatest pleasures of my life. That this collection should belong to the district, and remain in it, has been, and is, my great and constant desire. Unfortunately, however, I cannot afford to offer it as a free gift ; but to prove my great anxiety for its remaining in the neighbourhood, I have offered it to the East Riding...

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