A Dictionary of Electrical Words, Terms and Phrases

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W. J. Johnston Company, 1898 - Electric engineering - 990 pages
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Page 303 - Make a small cross of two light strips of cedar, the arms so long as to reach to the four corners of a large thin silk handkerchief when extended ; tie the corners of the handkerchief to the extremities of the cross, so you have the body of a kite ; which being properly accommodated with a tail, loop and string, will rise in the air like those made of paper ; but this, being of silk, is fitter to bear the wet and wind of a thunder-gust without tearing.
Page 567 - Ampere, which is one-tenth of the unit of current of the CGS system of electromagnetic units and which is represented sufficiently well for practical use by the unvarying current which, when passed through a solution of nitrate of silver in water, in accordance with a certain specification, deposits silver at the rate of 0.001118 of a gramme per second.
Page 634 - As a unit of resistance, the international ohm, which is based upon the ohm equal to 10" units of resistance of the CGS system of electromagnetic units, and is represented by the resistance offered to an unvarying electric current by a column of mercury at the temperature of melting ice, 14.4521 grams in mass, of a constant cross-sectional area and of the length of 106.3 centimetres.
Page 663 - As a unit of electromotive force, the international volt, which is the electromotive force that, steadily applied to a conductor whose resistance is one international ohm, will produce a current of one international ampere...
Page 304 - To the end of the twine, next the hand, is to be tied a silk ribbon, and where the silk and twine join, a key may be fastened. This kite is to be raised when a thunder-gust appears to be coming on, and the person who holds the string must stand within a door or window, or under some cover, so that the silk ribbon may not be wet; and care must be taken that the twine does not touch the frame of the door or window. As soon as any of the...
Page 613 - Henry, which is the induction in a circuit when the electro-motive force induced in this circuit is one international volt while the inducing current varies at the rate of one Ampere per second.
Page 303 - As frequent mention is made, in the public papers from Europe, of the success of the Philadelphia experiment, for drawing the electric fire from clouds, by means of pointed rods of iron erected on high buildings, &c. it may be agreeable to the curious to be informed, that the same experiment has succeeded in Philadelphia, though made in a different and more easy manner...
Page 137 - ... the conductor by the current. But the existence of induced currents and of electromagnetic actions at a distance from a primary circuit from which they draw their energy has led us, under the guidance of Faraday and Maxwell, to look upon the medium surrounding the conductor as playing a very important part in the development of the phenomena. If we believe in the continuity of the motion of energy, that is, if we believe that when it disappears at one point and reappears at another it must have...
Page 304 - This kite is to be raised when a thunder-gust appears to be coming on, and the person who holds the string must stand within a door or window, or under some cover, so that the silk ribbon may not be wet; and care must be taken that the twine does not touch the frame of the door or window. As soon as any of the thunder-clouds come over the kite, the pointed wire will draw the electric fire from them, and the kite, with all the twine, will be...
Page 166 - ... apparently greater in glass than in ebonite. I attribute this to the greater specific inductive capacity of the glass; in consequence of which, with the same potential difference, a greater amount of energy is taken up in it than in rubber. It is like connecting to a battery a copper and a brass wire of the same dimensions. The copper wire, though a more perfect conductor, would heat more by reason of its taking more current. Thus what is otherwise considered a virtue of the glass is here a defect....

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