A Dictionary of Medical Diagnosis: A Treatise on the Signs and Symptoms Observed in Diseased Conditions, for the Use of Medical Practitioners and Students

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Wood, 1907 - Diagnosis - 583 pages
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Page 390 - Moynihan: (1) In washing out the stomach part of the fluid is lost. (2) If the stomach is washed clean, a sudden reappearance of stomach contents may take place. (3) "Paradoxical dilatation" when the stomach has apparently been emptied, a splashing sound may be elicited by palpation of the pyloiic segment.
Page 152 - Haematemesis. 1. Previous history points to gastric, hepatic, or splenic disease. 2. The blood is brought up by vomiting, prior to which the patient may experience a feeling of giddiness or faintness. 3. The blood is usually clotted, mixed with particles of food, and has an acid reaction. It may be dark, grumous, and fluid. 4. Subsequent to the attack the patient passes tarry stools, and signs of disease of the abdominal viscera may be detected.
Page 40 - The heart possesses within itself a store of energy-yielding material, such that it may continue to give many hundreds or thousands of contractions after its supply of nutriment has been cut off.
Page 66 - They may then be kept for weeks if wrapped in tissue paper and kept from moisture, but it ia better to fix them at once. Fixation — 1. Heat. — In routine work one may discard all other methods for that of fixation in the free flame of a Bunsen burner. The slide, specimen side up, is passed slowly through the flame until it is decidedly too hot for the hand to bear. At this temperature, which probably varies between 110 and 150 C., fixation is complete in one to two minutes. A little practice...
Page 152 - HEMATEMESIS. 1. Previous history points to gastric, hepatic, or splenic disease. 2. The blood is brought up by vomiting, prior to which the patient may experience a feeling of giddiness or faintness. 3. The blood is usually clotted, mixed with particles of food, and has an acid reaction. It may be dark, grumous, and fluid. 4. Subsequent to the attack the patient passes tarry stools, and signs of disease of the abdominal viscera may be detected.
Page 235 - ... the centres of which have become permanently damaged. Limited lesions of the motor zone cause paralyses of those movements the centres of which the lesion invades. The result is not complete hemiplegia, but a monoplegia or dissociated paralysis. Hence, from a cortical lesion we may get a paralysis of the arm, or of the arm and face, or of the leg and arm, or of the face alone, or of the lateral movements of the head and eyes. Numerous examples of these monoplegias resulting from limited cortical...
Page 228 - Disease of the internal popliteal nerve paralyses the popliteus, calf muscles, tibialis posticus, and long flexors of the toes, as well as the muscles of the sole. In addition to the disability which characterises paralysis of the plantar...
Page 333 - These uew terms indicate that what really occurs in the Rolandic area is a. sense of movement, and this acts as a stimulus via the pyramidal tracts to the true motor centres which are in the opposite anterior horn of the spinal cord. If the posterior roots of the spinal nerves are divided there is a loss of sensation, and so the sense of movement cannot reach the brain from the muscles, and consequently the muscles are not called into action ; when all the posterior roots coming from a limb in a...
Page 390 - ... washed clean, a sudden reappearance of stomach contents may take place. 3. ' Paradoxical dilatation ' : when the stomach has apparently been emptied, a splashing sound may be elicited by palpation of the pyloric segment. 4. After distending the stomach a change in the position of the distension tumour may be seen in some cases.
Page 532 - Five drops of phenylhydrazin are mixed in a test-tube with 10 drops of glacial acetic acid and 1 cc of a saturated solution of sodium chlorid.

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