A Dictionary of the Anglo-Saxon Language: Containing the Accentuation - the Grammatical Inflections - the Irregular Words Referred to Their Themes - the Parallel Terms, from the Other Gothic Languages - the Meaning of the Anglo-Saxon in English and Latin - and Copious English and Latin Indexes, Serving as a Dictionary of English and Anglo-Saxon, as Well as of Latin and Anglo-Saxon

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Longman, Rees, Orme, Brown, Green, and Longman, 1838 - English language - 721 pages
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Page iv - And they said, Go to, let us build us a city and a tower, whose top may reach unto heaven; and let us make us a name, lest we be scattered abroad upon the face of the whole earth.
Page xx - The Gospels of the fower Euangelistes translated in the olde Saxons tyme out of Latin into the vulgare toung of the Saxons, newly collected out of Auncient Monumentes of the sayd Saxons, and now published for testimonie of the same at London.
Page xxi - An English-Saxon homily on the birthday of St. Gregory; anciently used in the English-Saxon church. Giving an account of the conversion of the English from paganism to Christianity. Translated into modern English, with notes, by Eliz. Elstob. London, Printed by W. Bowyer, 1709.
Page xxii - ANALECTA ANGLO-SAXONICA.— A Selection, in Prose and Verse, from Anglo-Saxon Authors, of various ages, with a Glossary. By Benjamin Thorpe, FSA A New Edition, with corrections and improvements. Post 8vo, cloth, 8s.
Page xxi - A Saxon Treatise Concerning the Old and New Testament. Written abovt the time of King Edgar (700 yeares agoe) by jtlfricvs Abbas, thought to be the same that was afterward Archbishop of Canterbvrie.
Page iv - Therefore is the name of it called Babel ; because the Lord did there confound the language of all the earth: and from thence did the Lord scatter them abroad upon the face of all the earth.
Page viii - By these were the isles of the Gentiles divided in their lands; every one after his tongue, after their families, in their nations.
Page xvii - Orientales Saxones, Meridiani Saxones, Occidui Saxones. Porro de Anglis, hoc est, de illa patria quae Angulus dicitur et ab eo tempore usque hodie manere desertus inter provincias Jutarum et Saxonum perhibetur...
Page xxxvi - The Italian is pleasant, but without sinews, as a still fleeting water. The French, delicate, but even nice as a woman, scarce daring to open her lips for fear of marring her countenance. The Spanish, majestical, but fulsome, running too much on the O, and terrible like the devil in a play.
Page xxxvi - Dutch, manlike, but withal very harsh, as one ready at every word to pick a quarrel. Now we, in borrowing from them, give the strength of consonants to the Italian, the full sound of words to the French...

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