A Dictionary of the Gaelic Language, in Two Parts: I. Gaelic and English.--II. English and Gaelic ...

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W. R. M'Phun, 1853 - English language - 1005 pages
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Page 84 - Highland plaid; a parti-coloured dress, used by the Celts from the earliest times. The breacan of the Highland king had seven different colours ; the Druidical tunic had six ; and that of the nobles four; breacan an fheilidh...
Page 84 - BREACAIR, brechg'-ar', nm the engraver's tool. BREACAN, brechg'-an, or bruchg'-an, nm tartan, tartan plaid, a Highland plaid; a parti-coloured dress, used by the Celts from the earliest times. The breacan of the Highland king had seven different colours ; the Druidical tunic had six ; and that of the nobles four...
Page 15 - a shealing ; hill pasture, or summer residence for herdsmen and cattle ; a level green among the hills.
Page 210 - ... should happen that he must get first for him the most marvellous bird that there was in the world. Then here went Brian, and he put the world under his head, till he went much farther than I can tell, or you can think, till he reached the house of CAILLEACH NAN CUARAN, the carlin of buskins. (A sock, a brogue of untanned leather or skin, commonly worn with the hairy side outward...
Page 121 - Dictionary,' p. 139, he will find the word ciar, in Celtic an adjective, "dusky, dark grey, dark brown, gloomy, stern." A fit word to apply to a heath, and hence, perhaps, to any level tract of ground. " Carr, a roughness, a rocky shelf or projecting part of a rock." " Can, sf, a level fertile tract of country. This word, though apparently English, is supposed to be derived from the Armoric dialect of the Celtic.* JS ANDERSON, FEIS Walton, Liverpool.
Page 204 - This last appellative, Cromleac, clearly points out this last class as Tombstones, at which they adored a deity, or which they recognised as a deity. Cromleac or Cromleachd, a substantive, fem. described as " A flat stone in an inclined position, supported by three stones, placed perpendicularly, commonly supposed a Druidical altar," is a compound of Cromadh, gen. Cromaidh, mas. " a bending, stooping, bowing, or prostrating," and leac or leachd, " a tombstone," Cromleac, or Cromleachd, a Cromlech...
Page 46 - ... Callwalls, and Benwells. It is the name of the sun Beal, and in composition often Bheal, being aspirated and sounded like w or v. For the rule in Gaelic for the sound of b is the following : — " B has two sounds ; one like b in English, as baile, " a town " beo, " alive ; '' the other aspirated like v in English, as bhuail, "struck.
Page 376 - a bend, curvature, a bending of the shore, a loop, a noose, a winding, meander, maze, a snare,' etc. As this was received with some derision, I tried to make out that it was of Scant!.

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