A Dictionary of the Malay Language, Volume 1

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authors at the Government's printing Office, 1894 - Malay language
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Page 294 - Dont waste your time at family funerals grieving for your relatives: attend to life, not to death: there are as good fish in the sea as ever came out of it, and better.
Page 271 - The toad beneath the harrow knows Exactly where each tooth point goes. The butterfly upon the road Preaches contentment to that toad.
Page 103 - Malays from its long and slender legs, and curved tusks resembling horns. This extraordinary creature resembles a pig in general appearance, but it does not dig with its snout, as it feeds on fallen fruits. The tusks of the lower jaw are very long and sharp, but the upper ones, instead of growing...
Page 103 - VOL. xvii. 8 tusks resembling horns. This extraordinary creature resembles a pig in general appearance, but it does not dig with its snout, as it feeds on fallen fruits. The tusks of the lower jaw are very long and sharp, but the upper ones instead of growing downwards in the usual way are completely reversed, growing upwards out of bony sockets through the skin on each side of the snout, curving backwards to near the eyes, and in old animals often reaching eight or ten inches in length.
Page 329 - ... same object as our own pegtop, the object being to split the top of one's opponent. Teetotums are also used, and I have seen in Selangor a species of bamboo humming-top, but was told that it was copied from a humming-top used by the Chinese. " The game of chess, which has been introduced from Arabia,2 is played in almost precisely the same manner as among Europeans, but the queen, instead of being placed upon her own colour, is stationed at the right hand of the king. In the Malay game the king,...
Page 160 - The name of a tree the bark of which is used for making twine for caulking, and for other purposes : Hibiscus tiliaceus.
Page 200 - Jdngan di-hdrap kata-kan buleh. The rhododendron is a wood of the jungle, The strings within the frame-work of the loom are in a tangled knot. It is true that I sit on thy lap, But do not therefore cherish the hope that thou canst take any other liberty. Here, it will be seen, the first two lines have no meaning, though according to the Malayan mind, on occasion, these "rhymemaking" lines are held to contain some obscure symbolic reference to those which follow them.
Page 119 - C., however, the meaning is, it is better that a quarrel should come to a head, even though it ends in the death of one of the parties concerned, than that ill-feeling should exist endlessly.
Page 403 - Pets are not numerous in their villages ; most of them are parrots which were captured by means of a noose attached to the end of a long pole.

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