A Dictionary of the Economic Products of India, Volume 6, Part 3

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Periodical Experts, 1893 - India
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Page 434 - It is with feelings of the highest possible satisfaction that we are enabled to announce to his Lordship in Council, that the tea shrub is beyond all doubt indigenous in Upper Assam, being found there through an extent of country of one month's march within the Honourable Company's territories...
Page 364 - The tree is felled, the branches lopped off, and the trunk cut into pieces of six feet long, a perpendicular incision made in each piece; the bark opened, and taken off whole, chopped, washed, and dried in the sun. By these means, and without any further process, it is fit for the purpose of clothing.
Page 416 - Yew is however reported to have one decided advantage over Digitalis by its effects not accumulating in the system ; so that it is a much more manageable and more efficient remedy.
Page 164 - Their cocoons are remarkably soft, and white or yellowish ; and the filament so exceedingly delicate, as to render it impracticable to wind off the silk : it is therefore spun like cotton. The yarn thus manufactured, is wove into a coarse kind of white cloth, of a seemingly loose texture, but of incredible durability.
Page 186 - French wine;) for and upon all wrought silks, bengals, and stuffs, mixed with silk or herba, of the manufacture of Persia, China, or East India, and all callico painted, dyed, printed, or stained there...
Page 180 - J inch long ; it appears composed of alternate black and yellow rings. As it increases in size, the former are distinguished as six black moles, in regular lines, on each of the twelve rings which form its body. The colours gradually alter as it progresses, that of the body becoming lighter, the moles sky-blue, then red with a bright gold-coloured ring round each. When...
Page 342 - It grows abundantly and luxuriantly on many uncultivated fields and commons, and furnishes grazing from April till frost. It thrives under much grazing and many mowings, and grows promptly after each if the soil is moist enough.
Page 319 - J —The bitter principle of the bark has been ascertained by Broughton" to be a nearly colourless resinous substance, sparingly soluble in water but more so in alcohol, ether, or benzol. It does not appear to unite with acids or bases, and is less soluble in water containing them than in pure water. It has a very bitter taste, and refuses to crystallize either from benzol or ether. It contains no nitrogen. To this we may add that the bark is rich in tannic acid.
Page 164 - Their cocoons are remarkably soft and white, or yellowish ; the filament so exceedingly delicate as to render it impracticable to wind off the silk : it is therefore spun like cotton. The yarn thus manufactured, is wove into a coarse kind of white cloth, of a seemingly loose texture, but of incredible durability, the life of one person being seldom sufficient to wear out a garment made of it ; so that the same piece descends from mother to daughter.
Page 158 - ... employment to themselves, the rearers have established certain rules of purity which they allege are absolutely necessary, and any infringement of which would totally destroy the success of their operations. Women, who would seem to be best fitted for such work, are entirely excluded, and even their wives are not permitted to approach the workers. The low castes are excluded, as their appetites are defiled by the gross impurity of animal food. The workers eat sparingly, once a-day, -of rice cleaned...

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