A dictionary of weather

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Oxford University Press, May 24, 2001 - Nature - 266 pages
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What is the coldest place on the planet? How does a hurricane form? What exactly is a low pressure system? And what area has the least, or most, amount of rainfall?
Answering these and many other intriguing questions, A Dictionary of Weather provides a comprehensive body of information with over 1,800 weather, forecasting, and climate terms, along with detailed illustrative examples of specific events and weather extremes. With this resource, you can easily find where and when the world's largest hailstone fell and where the highest temperature was recorded. Using the list of weather records, you can also check climate data for different weather types from around the world. Key terms from the related fields of oceanography, hydrology, and climatology are covered as are the important people in the development of meteorology, including Sir Francis Beaufort. In addition, there is a plate section that shows the main cloud types as well as satellite images of weather systems, making this book both highly informative and visually appealing for anyone who gets excited about our ever-changing weather.

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About the author (2001)


Storm Dunlop is an experienced writer on meteorology and astronomy. He is a Fellow of both the Royal Astronomical Society and the Royal Meteorological Society, and the photographic editor of the journal, Weather. He is also past president of the British Astronomical Association and has given many lectures and talks on all aspects of meteorology and astronomy. His previous works include Hamlyn Guide to Weather Forecasting (1982), Amateur Astronomy (1984), Atlas of the Night Sky (1984), Pocket Guide to Weather and Forecasting (1998), and Collins Gem Weather (1999).

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