A directory for the navigation of the Pacific ocean

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Page 371 - It is in this very latitude where we now were, that geographers have placed the pretended strait of Juan de Fuca. But we saw nothing like it; nor is there the least probability that ever any such thing existed.
Page 357 - On the south side of this promontory was the appearance of an inlet, or small river, the land behind not indicating it to be of any great extent; nor did it seem accessible for vessels of our burthen, as the breakers extended from the above point two or three miles into the ocean, until they joined those on the beach nearly four leagues further south.
Page 225 - Z under a large linden-tree, and when it rained much we sat in water above the ankles, the place being hollow. There were constantly twenty-four persons at table, eighteen of whom were kept fasting, because our ordinary consisted but of six dishes, and those very sparingly filled. From nine o'clock in the morning till three or four o'clock in the afternoon, we were shut up with the Queen, without daring to breathe the fresh air, or to go into the garden, although it was close by, because she would...
Page 410 - SE winds, which we found to blow with great violence; and the devastation they make sometimes was apparent in many places. The land bordering upon the sea-coast is of a middling height and level; but within the Sound, it rises almost every-where into steep hills, which agree in their general formation, ending in round or blunted tops, with some sharp, though not very prominent, ridges on their sides. Some of these hills may be reckoned high, while others of them are of a very moderate height; but...
Page 117 - This was the result of a night's debauch, and the fracas attendant upon it. No other punishment awaited the culprits than the remorse of their own conscience. Now, Valparaiso, and indeed all Chili, shows a great change for the better ; order reigns throughout ; crime is rarely heard of, and never goes unpunished ; good order and decorum prevail outwardly everywhere ; that engine of good government, an active and efficient police, has been established. It is admirably regulated, and brought fully...
Page 371 - Between this island or rock, and the northern extreme of the land, there appeared to be a small opening, which flattered us with the hopes of finding a harbour. These hopes lessened as we drew nearer; and, at last, we had some reason to think, that the opening was closed by low land. On this account I called the point of land to the north of it Cape Flattery.
Page 321 - Angeles, which he did not visit, as 'the noted abode of the lowest drunkards and gamblers of the country. This den of thieves is situated, as one may expect from its being almost twice as populous as the two other pueblos taken together, in one of the loveliest and most fertile districts of Cal.
Page 117 - I have had some opportunity of knowing Valparaiso, and contrasting its present state with that of 1821 and 1822. It was then a mere village, composed, with but few exceptions, of straggling ranches. It has now the appearance of a thickly settled town, with a population of thirty thousand, five times the number it had then.
Page 458 - To the north and east of this point the shores of the continent form two large open bays, which were terminated by compact solid mountains of ice, rising perpendicularly from the water's edge, and bounded to the north by a continuation of the united lofty frozen mountains that extend eastward from Mount Fairweather.
Page 611 - Gottsof ka and the Bistraia, which here empty themselves into this river; and the peninsula on which it stands has been separated from the continent by a large canal, the work of the present commander, which has not only added much to its strength as a fortress, but has made it much less liable than it was before to inundations. Below the town the river is from six to eight feet deep, and about a quarter of a mile broad. It empties itself into the sea of Okotsk...

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