A discourse of the pastoral care

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Printed for Dan. Midwinter at the Three Crowns, and Benj. Cowse at the Rose and Crown, both in St. Paul's Church-yard, 1713 - Clergy - 244 pages
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1821 / 252 pages / 205

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Page 10 - The diseased have ye not strengthened, neither have ye healed that which was sick, neither have ye bound up that which was broken, neither have ye brought again that which was driven away, neither have ye sought that which was lost; but with force and with cruelty have ye ruled them.
Page 31 - Simon, lovest thou me more than these ?" from which they justly gather, that the love of God, a zeal for his honour, and a preferring of that to all other things whatsoever, is a necessary and indispensable qualification for that holy employment; which distinguishes the true shepherd from the hireling, and by which only he can be both animated and fortified to go through with the labours and difficulties, as well as the dangers and sufferings, which may accompany it. When St. Paul was leaving his...
Page 42 - Obey them that have the rule over you, and submit yourselves : for they watch for your souls, as they that must give account, that they may do it with joy, and not with grief: for that is unprofitable for you.
Page 9 - Her priests have violated my law, and have profaned mine holy things : they have put no difference between the holy and profane, neither have they shewed difference between the unclean and the clean, and have hid their eyes from my sabbaths, and I am profaned among them.
Page 203 - ... ought thoroughly to understand all that he says, be fully persuaded of it, and bring himself to have those affections, which he desires to infuse into others. He that is inwardly persuaded of the truth of what he says, and...
Page 221 - ... of my life. For that pattern which I saw in him, and for that conversation which I had with him, I know how much I have to answer to God : and though my reflecting on that which I knew in him gives me just cause of being deeply humbled in myself, and before God; yet I feel no more sensible pleasure in any thing, than in going over in my thoughts all that I saw and observed in him.
Page 214 - ... to lay open a text to him, with all the matter that belongs to it, together with the order in which it ought to be both explained and applied. And when a man has attained to a tolerable degree in this, he is then the master of his business; he is master also of much time, and of many noble thoughts, and schemes that will arise out of them. This I shall prosecute no further ; for if this opening of it does not excite the reader to follow it a little, no enlargements I can offer upon it will work...
Page 200 - ... or not right heard; it has been fine, and has probably delighted the congregation, rather than edified it. But that sermon that makes every one go away silent and grave, and hastening to be alone, to meditate or pray over the matter of it in secret, has had its true effect.
Page 218 - ... joined together, we must never set asunder. " We must be setting constantly before our clergy their obligations to the several parts of their duty ; we must lay these upon them when we institute or collate them to churches in the solemnest manner, and with the weightiest words we can find. We must then lay the importance of the care of souls before them, and adjure them, as they will answer to God in the great day, in which we must appear to witness against them, that they will seriously consider...
Page 164 - ... plainly, that he who officiates is ' dead and formal' in it. A deep sense of the things prayed for, a true recollection and attention of spirit, and a holy earnestness of soul, will give a composure to the looks, and a weight to the pronunciation, that will be tempered between affectation on the one hand, and levity on the other.

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