A Discourse on the Importance of Character and Education in the United States: Delivered on the 20th of the 11th Mo. (November) 1822, Introductory to a Course of Lectures on Experimental Philosophy and Chemistry

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Mahlon Day, 1823 - Education - 26 pages
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Page 16 - The mathematics," says Dr. Barrow, "effectually exercise, not vainly delude, nor vexatiously torment, studious minds with obscure subtilties ; but plainly demonstrate every thing within their reach, draw certain conclusions, instruct by profitable rules, and unfold pleasant questions. These disciplines also inure and corroborate the mind...
Page 16 - While the mind is abstracted and elevated from sensible matter, it distinctly views pure forms, conceives the beauty of ideas, and investigates the harmony of proportions ; the manners themselves are sensibly corrected and improved; the affections composed and rectified ; the fancy calmed and settled ; and the understanding raised and excited to more divine contemplations.
Page 20 - The lever, the pulley, the wheel, and axle, the inclined plane, the wedge, and the screw.
Page 16 - ... perfectly subject us to the government of right reason. While the mind is abstracted and elevated from sensible matter, distinctly views pure forms, conceives the beauty of ideas, and investigates the harmony of proportions ; the manners themselves are sensibly corrected and improved, the affections composed and rectified, the fancy calmed and settled, and the understanding raised and excited to more divine contemplation.
Page 16 - These disciplines likewise inure and corroborate the mind to a constant diligence in study ; they wholly deliver us from a credulous simplicity...
Page 3 - Hitchcock for the interesting and valuable address delivered last evening; and that a copy of the same be requested for publication.
Page 13 - Masonry does not pretend to teach any thing in the relations of man to man, and of man to his Creator, but what we find communicated in Divine Revelation.

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