A Doll's House: Ghosts

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C. Scribner's Sons, 1911 - 295 pages
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Contents

I
1
II
62
III
110
IV
159
V
215
VI
265

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Page 144 - No; only merry. And you have always been so kind to me. But our house has been nothing but a play-room. Here I have been your doll-wife, just as at home I used to be Papa's doll-child. And the children, in their turn, have been my dolls. I thought it fun when you played with me, just as the children did when I played with them. That has been our marriage, Torvald.
Page 154 - Torvald — when a wife leaves her husband's house, as I am doing, I have heard that in the eyes of the law he is free from all duties towards her. At any rate, I release you from all duties. You must not feel yourself bound, any more than I shall.
Page 147 - Helmer: Before all else you are a wife and a mother. Nora: That I no longer believe. I believe that before all else I am a human being, just as much as you are@or at least that I should try to become one.
Page 136 - I don't want any melodramatic airs. [Locks the outer door.} Here you shall stay and give an account of yourself. Do you understand what you have done? Answer! Do you understand it? Nora. {Looks at him fixedly, and says with a stiffening expression.} Yes; now I begin fully to understand it.
Page 55 - Where shall I stand it, ma'am? NORA. There, in the middle of the room. ELLEN. Shall I bring in anything else? NORA. No, thank you, I have all I want. [ELLEN, having put down the tree, goes out. NORA. [Busy dressing the tree.] There must be a candle here — and flowers there.
Page 156 - HELMER. [Sinks into a chair by the door with his face in his hands.] Nora! Nora! [He looks round and rises.] Empty. She is gone. [A hope springs up in him.] Ah! The miracle of miracles ?! [From below is heard the reverberation of a heavy door dosing.
Page 31 - Then it was really he? NORA. Do you know him? MRS. LINDEN. I used to know him — many years ago. He was in a lawyer's office in our town. NORA. Yes, so he was. MRS. LINDEN. How he has changed! NORA. I believe his marriage was unhappy. MRS. LINDEN. And he is a widower now? NORA. With a lot of children. There!
Page 142 - What should strike me? NORA We have been married eight years. Does it not strike you that this is the first time we two, you and I, man and wife, have talked together seriously?
Page 154 - I have heard that in the eyes of the law he is free from all duties towards her. At any rate, I release you from all duties. You must not feel yourself bound, any more than I shall. There must be perfect freedom on both sides. There, I give yeu back your ring.
Page 149 - HELMER. Nora, you are ill; you are feverish; I almost think you are out of your senses. NORA. I have never felt so much clearness and certainty as to-night.

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