A Familiar Introducton to the Study of Polarized Light: With a Description Of, and Instructions for Using, the Table and Hydro-oxygen Polariscope and Microscope

Front Cover
Smith & Beck, 1851 - Polarization (Light) - 46 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page iii - A FAMILIAR INTRODUCTION TO THE STUDY OF POLARIZED LIGHT ; with a Description of, and Instructions for Using, the Table and Hydro-Oxygen, Polariscope and Microscope.
Page 30 - B" for yellow and blue of the two systems severally meeting together in the same state of vibration, occasioned by the difference of an even number of half undulations, and forming by their coincidences waves of...
Page 21 - ... index of refraction. When oriented in one position with respect to the direction of the incident ray, the crystal behaves normally, and that direction is called the optic axis of the crystal. A ray incident on the crystal to form an angle with the optic axis is broken into two rays, one of which obeys the ordinary laws of refraction and is called the ordinary ray, the second ray is called the extraordinary ray. The two rays are plane-polarized in mutually perpendicular planes. By eliminating...
Page 11 - ... a sunbeam through a hole (O) made with a fine needle in thick paper, and brought into the diverging beam a slip of card (AB) one-thirtieth of an inch in breadth, and observed its shadow (EF) on a white screen, at different distances. The shadow was divided by parallel bands, but the central line (X) was always white. That these bands originated in the interference of the light passing on both sides of the card, Dr. Young demonstrated by simply intercepting the light on one side by a screen (CD),...
Page 30 - Be for yellow and blue of the ordinary and extraordinary systems respectively meeting together, with a difference of an odd number of half undulations, and thus neutralizing each other by interferences. " N, red light, the result of the coincidence of the waves for red light, and the neutralization by interferences of those for yellow and blue respectively.
Page 29 - ... polarizer, and so turned that AB may vibrate in the plane of its crystallographical axis. " F, light polarized by E, by stopping the vibrations CD, and transmitting those of A B. " G, a piece of selenite of such a thickness as to produce red light and its complementary colour, green. " H, the polarized light F bifurcated, or divided into ordinary and extraordinary rays, and thus said to be dipolarized by the double refractor G, and forming two planes of polarized light o and e, vibrating at right...
Page 11 - This distinguished philosopher — whose attainments and knowledge were insufficiently estimated while he was living — passed a sunbeam through a hole (O) made with a fine needle in thick paper, and brought into the diverging beam a slip of card (AB) one-thirtieth of an inch in breadth, and observed its shadow (EF) on a white screen, at different distances. The shadow was divided by parallel bands, but the central line (X) was always white. That these bands originated in the interference of the...
Page 10 - Newtonian theory of light, or the theory of emission, as it is called, in which light is supposed to consist of material particles emitted by luminous bodies, and moving through space with a velocity of 192,000 miles in a second, the quantity d is double the interval of the fits of easy...
Page 47 - Huyghenian eye-pieces; stage half-inch thick, with vertical and horizontal actions (given by rackwork and screw, or lever), sliding and revolving planes and spring clamping piece ; diaphragm with revolving and removable fittings ; large...
Page 22 - But if the ray falls upon the second glass at an angle of 56 from the perpendicular, the light reflected by the first glass will be again reflected by the second, when the planes of the two glasses are parallel to each other ; but if, without altering its angle to the horizon, we turn the second glass to the quarter of a circle, the light will be transmitted, not reflected ; if we turn it another quarter, the light will be reflected, not transmitted. By this we prove that light reflected at an...

Bibliographic information