A Field Book for Civil Engineers

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Ginn, 1893 - Railroad engineering - 281 pages
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Page 119 - If a plane area revolve through any angle round a line in its plane, the volume generated is equal to the area of the revolving figure multiplied by the length of the path described by its centroid.
Page 6 - For one min. ) 10.00' 6.05' 2.01' 1.85' 1.51' 1.35' 1.30' error in dec. ' | For one min. ) 9.92' 4.87' 2.26' 1.30' 0.75' 0.35' 0.00' error in lat. ' PLANE SURVEYING. a slender brass spring hoop, and actuated by independent screws dd, by which the distance between the two movable wires can be adjusted to include a given space ; as, 1 foot on a rod 100 feet distant. These wires will in the same manner include 2 feet on a rod 200 feet distant, or half a foot at a distance of 50 feet, and so on in the...
Page 9 - The third member of this equation may safely be neglected, as it is very small, even for long distances and large angles of elevation (for 1500', ;i=45°and &=100, it is but 0.07').
Page 16 - ... of the bar. The necessity for this operation arises from the fact, that when the telescope is reversed end for end in the wyes in the other and principal adjustment of the bubble, we are not certain of placing the...
Page 278 - Metres. 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Feet. Feet. Feet. Feet. Feet. Feet. Feet. Feet. Feet. Feet. 0 0.000 3.2809...
Page 21 - ... given points. The first sight taken after setting up the level is called a back-sight, or plus sight ; those taken after this, and before the instrument is moved, are called fore-sights or minus sights. As the difference of the readings of the rod on two points gives their difference of elevation, the difference of the sum of the plus sights, and the sum of the minus sights on TP's and the last point will give the difference in elevation of the extreme points. In the above example 0.824 10.432...
Page 219 - ... .70793 4 57 .65540 .75528 .66848 .74373 .68136 .73195 .69403 .71995 .70649 .70772 3 58 .65562 .75509 .66870 .74353 .68157 .73175 .69424 .71974 .70670 .70752 2 59 .65584 .75490 .66891 .74334 .68179 .73155 .69445 .71954 .70690 .70731 1 60 .65606 .75471 .66913 .74314 .68200 .73135 .69466 .71934 .70711 .70711 0 / Cosin Sine Cosin Sine Cosin Sine Cosin Sine Cosin Sine f I 49° 48° 47° 46° 45° TABLE V.— NATURAL TANGENTS AND COTANGENTS.
Page 236 - Tang / 77° 1 76° . 75° 74° / / 16° 17° 18° 19° / Tang Cotang Tang Cotang Tang Cotang Tang Cotang 0...
Page 270 - Depth Base 12 Base 14 Base 16 Base 18 Base 20 Base 28 Base 30 Base 32 1...
Page 234 - COTANGENTS. / 8° 9° 1O° 11° / Tang Cotang Tang Cotang Tang Cotang Tang Cotang 0 .14054 7.11537 .15838 6.31375 .17633 5.67128 .19438 5.14455 60 1 .14084 7.10038 .15868 6.30189...

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