A Full Answer to the Conduct of the Allies: To which is Added Some Observations on the Remarks on the Barrier Treaty

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Printed, 1712 - Barrier treaty, 1709 - 95 pages
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Page i - ... Presented by Professor HJ Davis August 1963 To commemorate a long association with the Oxford English Faculty Library of which Mrs. Davis...
Page 80 - Majesty, the 2gth of October, 1709, the treaty of mutual guaranty, commonly called the Barrier Treaty, ratified on both sides in the most authentic form, they looked upon it not only as a foundation of their own safety, for securing which they entered into the present war, and have carried it on so many years, but likewise as a firm support of that good understanding and union between her Majesty and their State, which they so earnestly and sincerely desire to see continued ; so that they could never...
Page 81 - ... Majesty's subjects in the Spanish Netherlands, and that some had entertained an ill-grounded and erroneous opinion, that the States might design to take advantage by it, to make themselves masters of the said Spanish Netherlands ; their High Mightinesses did declare, positively, and by this letter do voluntarily repeat it, that it never was their intention, nor ever will be, to make use of the said Treaty, or of their garrisons in the fortified places of the country, to prejudice, in any manner,...
Page 59 - Toulon in pofleffion of the allies ; for, even with thefe difcouragements, the attempt might yet have fucceeded, if prince Eugene had not thought fit to oppofe it ; which cannot be imputed to his own judgment, but to fome politic rcafbns of his court.
Page 82 - ... apparent necessity. That they hope by this positive declaration, to have the happiness to remove all those suspicions which may wrongfully have been conceived against them ; and that they have firm confidence in her Majesty's so renowned equity, that she will not do anything in prejudice of the said Treaty, nor permit any to be done to it ; but rather that she will be pleased to see that they may have the entire effect of it, and take off all uneasiness they may be in about it; which they most...
Page 81 - ... relates to navigation and commerce there, ought to be settled on an entire equality, that so her Majesty's subjects may not be charged with higher duties of importation or exportation than theirs, to the end commerce may be carried on there by both nations on an equal foot. That their High Mightinesses did declare, and do declare again by this letter, that they never had a thought, nor have now, of making themand the tenants own me for master; but has not Esquire South the equity of redemption?
Page 81 - ... they were put in hopes would not be very hard to do, when once they should have consented to concur with her Majesty, as they did, to procure a congress for the negotiation of a general peace. But that the misfortune was, that the said M. Buys, during his residence in England, was not able to finish that affair to reciprocal satisfaction ; and that it having been remitted to the Hague, no way has hitherto been found to terminate it there neither ; though their High Mightinesses think they have...
Page 80 - ... years ago he took thee out of the spunginghouse ? " t [Tis true my friend Nic. did so, and I * The letter here produced was written by the States in defence of the Barrier Treaty, to the Queen of Great Britain, wherein they represented, " That during the whole course of her Majesty's glorious reign, they have had nothing more at heart, than to cultivate and maintain with her a good friendship, perfect confidence, and union, and to corroborate them the most they possibly could ; having always...
Page 58 - Defign was difcover'd here by the Creature of a Great Man laying Wagers about the taking of it. This is a very odd way of proving that Toulon was loft, or rather not! gain'd, by the Emperor's Negleft, to tell us firft, that very probably it was not •, for the Defign was Difcover d here.
Page 82 - ... they may have the entire effect of it, and take off all uneasiness they may be in about it; which they most earnestly desire of her Majesty. Adding, that if there be some articles of the said treaty, which, without affecting the essentials of it, may be thought to want explanation, her Majesty shall find them willing and ready to treat thereupon, and with all the facility and condescension that can reasonably be required of them, without doing prejudice to the rights they have acquired, not only...

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