A full exposure of Ann Moore, the pretended fasting woman of Tutbury

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author and sold, 1813 - Fasting - 30 pages
 

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Page 21 - Moore, of Tutbury, humbly asking pardon of all persons whom I have attempted to deceive and impose upon, and, above all, with the most unfeigned sorrow and contrition, imploring the divine mercy and forgiveness of that God whom I have greatly offended, do most solemnly declare, that I have occasionally taken sustenance for the last six years. " Witness my hand, this fourth day of May, 1813. The mark x of ANNE MOORE.
Page 12 - The removal of her person from one bed to another was closely watched in every circumstance by all the gentlemen ; after which, at her own request, her person was examined, and every possible satisfaction afforded, that no collusion could have taken place in any part of the transaction. Not a single article of any kind or description remained unexplored ; and, when the business of search and removal was concluded, no doubt was left upon the...
Page 22 - I, Ann Moore, of Tutbury, humbly asking pardon of all persons whom I have attempted to deceive and impose upon, and above all with the most unfeigned sorrow and contrition imploring the Divine Mercy and Forgiveness of that God whom I have so greatly offended, do most solemnly declare, that I have occasionally taken sustenance for the last six years.
Page 19 - ... no food whatever. Great confidence was now expressed by her advocates that she would endure the ordeal with credit. But when the machine for weighing her was put under the bed, it was found that she lost weight rapidly. At last, on the ninth day, she insisted upon the watches quitting the room, declaring that she was very ill, and that her daughter must be sent for.
Page 4 - ... days. When the watch had ended, she was removed to her own house; and Mr. Taylor published an account, declaring that she had lived for thirteen days without taking any food, liquid or solid. This account, so attested, was believed by numbers, who flocked to see her, and few visited her without leaving some proof of their credulity or pity. By this means she collected about 250.
Page 3 - About the beginning of 1SO7, when residing at Tutbury, a village in Staffordshire, she first excited public attention, by declaring she could live without food. An assertion so repugnant to reason and nature was of course rejected. She therefore offered to prove the truth of her assertion by submitting to be watched for a considerable time. In order to satisfy the public, she was removed from her home to the house of Mr. Jackson, grocer, of the same village, and all the inhabitants were invited to...
Page 12 - ... satisfy the public mind, through the medium of the committee and the watchers, as to the truth or falsehood of the case. Her bedstead is placed upon a Merlin's weighing machine, constructed with peculiar accuracy, in order to ascertain the variations of weight during the period of the watch. A number of gentlemen, who undertook to watch her, have signed their names to a report, attesting the minute examination, which they made, and their positive conviction, that no aliment of any kind had or...
Page 22 - The above declaration of Ann Moore was made before me, one of his Majesty's justices of the peace for the county of Stafford. "THOMAS LISTER." " Witness to the above declaration and signature of my mother Ann Moore.
Page 10 - Richmond, and followed by several other gentlemen. At the end of seven days, the public was informed that she had during that time taken no food whatever. Great confidence was now expressed by her advocates that she would endure the ordeal with credit. But when the machine for weighing her was put under the bed, it was found that she lost weight rapidly. At last, on the ninth day, she insisted upon the watches quitting the room, declaring that she...
Page 22 - I have so greatly offended, do most solemnly declare, that I have occasionally taken sustenance for the last six years. " Witness my hand, this fourth day of May, 1813. The x of ANN MOORE." " The above declaration of Ann Moore was made before •me, one of his Majesty's justices of the peace for the county of Stafford. "THOMAS LISTER.

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