A General and Descriptive History of the Ancient and Present State, of the Town of Liverpool: Comprising, a Review of Its Government, Police, Antiquities, and Modern Improvements; the Progressive Increase of Street, Square, Public Buildings, and Inhabitants, Together with a Circumstantial Account of the True Causes of Its Extensive African Trade : the Whole Carefully Compiled from Original Manuscripts, Authentic Records, and Other Warranted Authorities

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R. Phillips, 1795 - Liverpool (England) - 301 pages
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i read this book in liverpool library over 15 yrs ago whilst researching my family history and found it most helpful i wish it had been on line then it would have saved me alot of expense in travel i highly recomend it for any fanily history buff

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Page 46 - ... a ditch twelve yards wide, and ten yards deep, from which to the river was a covered way, through which the ditch was filled with water, and by which, when the tide was out, men, provisions, and military stores were brought as occasion required. In and upon this castle were planted many cannon, which not only annoyed the besiegers at some distance, but also covered the ships in the harbour. At the entrance was a fort of eight guns to guard that, and to prevent all passage by the river at low...
Page 227 - This great annual return of wealth may be said to pervade the whole town, increasing the fortunes of the principal adventurers, and contributing to the support of the majority of the inhabitants; almost every man in Liverpool is a merchant, and he who cannot send a bale, will send a bandbox, it will therefore create little astonishment, that the attractive African meteor has from time to time so dazzled their ideas, that almost every order of people is interested in a Guinea cargo...
Page 45 - George's church now stands) surrounded by a ditch twelve yards wide, and ten yards deep, from which to the river was a covered way, through which the ditch was filled with water, and by which, when the tide was out, men, provisions, and military stores were brought as occasion required.
Page 223 - But the slave trade was always a risky business. "The African Commerce," it was written in 1795, "holds forward one constant train of uncertainty, the time of slaving is precarious, the length of the middle passage uncertain, a vessel may be in part, or wholly cut off, mortalities may be great, and various other incidents may arise impossible to be foreseen.
Page 272 - ... and diligent in their duty, but in the execution of their business while they remove one evil they never fail to create a greater ; the soil, instead of being immediately carried away as in London and other places, is raked into heaps about twelve feet by eight, and two feet deep. These cloacinian repositories are common in every part of the town, and remain eight or ten days, and sometimes longer, before they are carted away, whereby passengers in a dark night, and often in the day, tread in...
Page 285 - ... the mayor and aldermen of the town aforesaid, for the time being, or the greater part of them, into separate companies, guilds or fraternities of the same art.
Page 39 - The Mersey, spreading and presently contracting its stream from Warrington, falls into the ocean with a wide channel, very convenient for trade, where opens to view Litherpole, commonly called Lirpoole, from a water extending like a pool, according to the common opinion, where is the most convenient and most frequented passage to Ireland ; a town more famous for its beauty and populousness than for its antiquity.
Page 271 - ... new Local Act in this respect. " Were the magistrates to levy the fine a few times in the winter months, it would awaken the attention of some of the inhabitants " (ibid. 3rd December 1789). At Liverpool in 1797, in spite of repeated Local Acts, it was observed that " the footpaths are generally very dirty, the pebbles gathering mud in their interstices, and as the custom is not general of sweeping daily before the houses, it soon becomes a clammy dirt, which adheres to the feet of the passenger...
Page 281 - Liverpool is the only town in England of any pre-eminency that has not one single erection or endowment, for the advancement of science, the cultivation of the arts, or promotion of useful knowledge...
Page 133 - a Christian devout and exemplary in the exercise of every private and publick duty, friend to mercy, patron to distress, an enemy only to vice and sloth, he lived esteemed by all who knew him .. . and died lamented by the wise and good.

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