A general history and collection of voyages and travels, arranged in systematic order: forming a complete history of the origin and progress of navigation, discovery, and commerce, by sea and land, from the earliest ages to the present time, Volume 17

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Robert Kerr
W. Blackwood, 1824 - Explorers
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Page 259 - The rage with which our seamen were possessed to return to Cook's River, and, by another cargo of skins, to make their fortunes at one time, was not far short of mutiny...
Page 258 - One of our seamen sold his stock alone for eight hundred dollars ; and a few prime skins, which were clean and had been well preserved, were sold for one hundred and twenty each. The whole amount of the value in specie and goods that was got for the furs in both ships, I am confident did not fall short of...
Page 323 - These were visited by an officer in the yawl, who was to endeavour to prevail upon them to join the rest ; but finding them in the greatest disorder, and disposed to mutiny, he was obliged to desist from his purpose, and return without them.
Page 258 - When, in addition to these facts, it is remembered, that the furs were, at first, collected without our having any idea of their real value; that the greatest part had been worn by the Indians, from whom we purchased them; that they were afterward preserved with little care, and frequently used for bed-clothes, and other purposes, during our...
Page 20 - America, nor uniformly .curling, as amongst the African negroes, but varying, in this respect, like the hair of Europeans. One striking peculiarity, in the features of every part of this great nation, I do not remember to have seen...
Page 327 - ... among the rocks) was with difficulty withheld from making a meal of it. The men were so assiduous in their research after the few things which drove from the wreck, that in order to have no sharers of their good...
Page 325 - One thing in this outrage they seemed particularly attentive to, which was, to provide themselves with arms and ammunition, in order to support them in putting their mutinous designs in execution, and asserting their claim to a lawless exemption from the authority of their officers, which they pretended must cease with the loss of the ship. But of these arms, which we stood in great need of, they were soon bereaved, upon coming ashore, by the resolution of Captain Cheap and Lieutenant Hamilton of...
Page 267 - Life are multiplied and augmented, and Science of other kinds increased to the Benefit of Mankind in general. This is therefore most earnestly to recommend...
Page 37 - ... through one of these, or, in case of failure, to quit it, before they reach the rocks, and, plunging under the wave, make the best of their way back again. This is reckoned very disgraceful, and is also attended with...
Page 378 - ... had quite lost himself, not recollecting our names that were about him, or even his own. His beard was as long as a hermit's, that and his face being covered with train-oil and dirt, from having long accustomed himself to sleep upon a bag, by the way of pillow, in which he kept the stinking seal.

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