A Geological History of Manhattan Or New York Island: Together with a Map of the Island, and a Suite of Sections, Tables and Columns, for the Study of Geology, Particularly Adapted for the American Student

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W.E. Dean, 1843 - Geology - 114 pages
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Page 21 - NEW YORK WATER WORKS (No. 1911.) This Note shall entitle the Bearer to the sum of Four Shillings current money of the Colony of New York, payable on Demand, by the Mayor, Aldermen and Commonalty of the City of New York, at the office of Chamberlain of the said City, pursuant to a Vote of the said Mayor, Aldermen and Commonalty, of this Date. Dated the Sixth Day of January, in the Year of our Lord One Thousand Seven Hundred and Seventy Six.
Page 22 - Hudson,' with the Newark Mountains in the distance, the farm-houses and country seats of the island, and that stupendous work of nature, the palisades on the north, and on the east the high ridge of that fertile plain, Long Island.* West of Broadway to Fourth St. a range of hills extended, apparently similar in character to the cobble-stone heaps that prevail in and around Brooklyn to-day. These hills were remarkable for the abundance of quail and woodcock found in their shelters. The section about...
Page 51 - Island," etc., pp 114 (1843). Transactions NY Acad, Sci. Vol. XII. July 15, 1893. ber of the Cretaceous Group [New Jersey Marl] underlies Long Island, and may be a continuation of the great range which begins at the south, in Virginia, and runs through New Jersey to the Neversink Hills, at which place it is last seen above the surface.
Page 13 - This carbonate of lime has small specks of serpentine diffused through it, and forms a kind of 'verd antique,' which, when polished, makes handsome specimens. " 4th. Gneiss. — This rock has a greater extent, and shows itself more than any other on this island ; it begins at the Battery, which it underlies; it was to be seen also at the lower end of E. 14th st. ; in 8th st. west of the 3d avenue, in digging a well, it was found eighteen feet below the surface.
Page 22 - Streets, a steep accumulation of earth, boulder and sand, one hundred feet higher than the level of Grand St. This hill possessed considerable elevation, and from its dome, Cozzens, reviewing his boyhood recollections, says, " was seen the bay, with the hills of Staten Island still further in the south ; then turning to the west the ' noble Hudson,' with the Newark mountains in the distance, the farm houses and country seats of the island, and that stupendous work of nature, the Palisades on the...
Page 15 - ... Co. ; it forms the rock at the straits called Hell-gate, and even at that place (where it may be traced some eight or ten miles) underlying Long Island. " The gneiss of New York Island is a peculiar variety. It has more mica than common, and which is also in larger plates than usual for this rock. The dip of this rock varies from the extreme of horizontal to vertical • " 5th. Hornblende Slate. — This rock is associated with the gneiss in many parts of the island ; at Spuyten-Duy vel bluff,...
Page 14 - ... Gneiss. — This rock has a greater extent, and shows itself more than any other on this island ; it begins at the Battery, which it underlies ; it was to be seen also at the lower end of E. 14th st. ; in 8th st. west of the 3d avenue, in digging a well, it was found eighteen feet below the surface. " This rock begins on the south side of, and underlies Governor's Island, which is its most southern extent, passing through New York Island, and running through the greater part of Westchester Co....
Page 69 - At the termmation of this stratum is a small valley, and beyond it a large mound of fragments of the sandstone and two limestones; the former most abundant. These fragments are thrown together in the greatest confusion, and bear conclusive evidence of the action of a powerful current. Dr. Scovill has erected a large house and several other buildings on the top of this elevation, (A,) from the imbedded masses; a well was dug seventy feet deep in the same place, without finding the termination of the...
Page 11 - ... his description of our Island. " This island is about thirteen miles long. It consists of eight different series or formations of rock, as follows :
Page 15 - Primitive Limestone of King's Bridge is well known; it is a dolomite, and has all the varieties of white, grey, and light blue, granular, coarse marble ; it begins at the south end of Mr. Dyckman's farm, and runs through the middle of the Island to Spuyten-Duyvel creek; this formation rests on granite.

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