A glance at London, Brussels, and Paris: by a provincial Scotsman

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Page 57 - tis, to cast one's eyes so low! The crows and choughs, that wing the midway air, Show scarce so gross as beetles : Half way down Hangs one that gathers samphire; dreadful trade! Methinks, he seems no bigger than his head: The fishermen, that walk upon the beach, Appear like mice; and yon...
Page 57 - Appear like mice; and yon' tall anchoring bark, Diminish'd to her cock; her cock, a buoy Almost too small for sight: The murmuring surge, That on the unnumber'd idle pebbles chafes, Cannot be heard so high: — I'll look no more; Lest my brain turn, and the deficient sight Topple down headlong.
Page 22 - O that they were wise, that they understood this, that they would consider their latter end!
Page 146 - That strain again ! — it had a dying fall : Oh, it came o'er my ear like the sweet south That breathes upon a bank of violets, ( Stealing and giving odour !— Enough ; no more ; ( 'Tis not so sweet now, as it was before.
Page 53 - ... battle of Waterloo had done in arms !" We shall not stay to decide between the battle and the picture ; but the writer follows up the same idea of the Terrible Sublime in the Catalogue, the first paragraph of which is conceived in the following terms : — " The general effect proposed to be excited by this picture is the terrible sublime, and its various modifications, until lost in the opposite extremes of pity and horror, a sentiment which painting has so seldom attempted to awaken, that a...
Page 74 - The wolf also shall dwell with the lamb, and the leopard shall lie down with the kid; and the calf and the young lion and the fatling together; and a little child shall lead them. And the cow and the bear shall feed; their young ones shall lie down together: and the lion shall eat straw like the ox. And the sucking child shall play on the hole of the asp, and the weaned child shall put his hand on the cockatrice
Page 153 - England ; there is therefore a larger demand throughout for trinkets, ornaments, prints, pictures, and dress. The multitude of print-shops, of booths for millinery, and every thing that administers to the vanity of man and woman kind, is unequalled in this metropolis of gaiety. Much small business is transacted in the open air ; and the banks of the Seine are loaded with almost every saleable thing for human accommodation.
Page 154 - Paris; and pissed through some streets, if such they might be called, of a description that surpassed all my former ideas. The hideous darkness of eight stories mourned over-head ; and there seemed room for two carriages merely to graze each other in passing below. Truly a more continuous gloom I never witnessed. Any scene of horror, of however deep dye and terrible extent, mi^ht have taken place in this dismal abode.
Page 111 - There was soup made from boiled beef and turkey, with toasted bread floating in it; boiled carrots, and other vegetables, were handed round along with it. There followed a dish of bouilli, or boiled meat, tender and good.
Page 111 - Some boiled asparagus came after this, and other vegetables ; a sallad of lettuce, and something else, which I forget, dressed with a choice sauce ; a course of sweetmeats succeeded, and the whole concluded with well toasted cheese, and Strong ale of a peculiarly agreeable quality.

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