A glossary and etymological dictionary: of obsolete and uncommon words, antiquated phrases, and proverbs illustrative of early English literature, comprising chiefly those not to be found in our ordinary dictionaries; with historical notices of ancient customs and manners

Front Cover
T. Bennett, 1834 - Reference - 467 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 41 - All murder'd : for within the hollow crown That rounds the mortal temples of a king Keeps Death his court, and there the antic sits, Scoffing his state and grinning at his pomp...
Page 80 - Our bruised arms hung up for monuments ; Our stern alarums changed to merry meetings, Our dreadful marches to delightful measures. Grim-visaged war hath smooth'd his wrinkled front; And now, instead of mounting barbed steeds To fright the souls of fearful adversaries, He capers nimbly in a lady's chamber To the lascivious pleasing of a lute.
Page 130 - I know each lane, and every alley green, Dingle, or bushy dell, of this wild wood, And every bosky bourn from side to side, My daily walks and ancient neighbourhood...
Page 226 - ... soldier's neck, And then dreams he of cutting foreign throats, Of breaches, ambuscadoes, Spanish blades, Of healths five fathom deep ; and then anon Drums in his ear, at which he starts, and wakes ; And, being thus frighted, swears a prayer or two, And sleeps again. This is that very Mab, That plats the manes of horses in the night; And bakes the elf-locks in foul sluttish hairs, Which, once untangled, much misfortune bodes.
Page 294 - What hands are here? ha! they pluck out mine eyes! Will all great Neptune's ocean wash this blood Clean from my hand? No; this my hand will rather The multitudinous seas incarnadine, Making the green one red.
Page 17 - ... were made in England, show us here The mettle of your pasture ; let us swear That you are worth your breeding : which I doubt not; For there is none of you so mean and base, That hath not noble lustre in your eyes. I see you stand like greyhounds in the slips,* Straining upon the start. The game's afoot ; Follow your spirit : and, upon this charge, Cry — God for Harry ! England ! and Saint George ! [Exeunt . Alarum, and Chambers go off.
Page 160 - By'r lady, your ladyship is nearer to heaven than when I saw you last, by the altitude of a chopine.
Page 339 - tis his will : Let but the commons hear this testament, (Which, pardon me, I do not mean to read) And they would go and kiss dead Caesar's wounds, And dip their napkins in his sacred blood ; Yea, beg a hair of him for memory, And, dying, mention it within their wills, Bequeathing it, as a rich legacy, Unto their issue.
Page 108 - I'll observe his looks; I'll tent him to the quick: if he but blench, I know my course.
Page 400 - To sit at the table above or below the salt was a mark of distinction in opulent families. The salt was contained in a massive silver utensil called a saler, now corrupted into cellar, which was placed in the middle of the table ; persons of distinction sat nearest the head of the table, or above the salt, and inferior relations or dependants below it. Page 193, line 1 ; NEWES FROM THE CHURCH]. In the sixth edition this is subscribed "Jo. Ruddiard.

Bibliographic information