A Glossary of Terms Used in Grecian, Roman, Italian, and Gothic Architecture, Volume 1

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J.H. Parker, 1840 - Architecture
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Page 22 - Battinm], a name given to the courts or wards of a castle formed by the spaces between the circuits of walls or defences which surrounded the keep...
Page 265 - Society, they shall request the author to furnish a copy, and shall decide upon the number of copies to be printed, provided always that the number bo sufficient to supply each Member with one copy, and the author and Secretaries with twentyfive copies each.
Page 94 - ACCORDING to a former Constitution, too much neglected in many places, we appoint, that there shall be a font of stone in every church and chapel where baptism is to be ministered ; the same to be set in the ancient usual places : in which only font the minister shall baptize publicly.
Page 178 - The arches are round : are supported on pillars retaining traces of the classical proportions, but generally much more massive ; the pilasters, cornices, and entablatures, have a correspondence and similarity with those of classical architecture ; there is a prevalence of rectangular faces and square-edged projections ; the openings in...
Page 179 - This same kind of architecture, or perhaps particular modifications of it, have been by various persons termed Saxon, Norman, Lombard, Byzantine, &c. All these names imply suppositions, with regard to the history of this architecture, which it might be difficult to substantiate ; and would, moreover, in most cases, not be understood to describe the style in that generality which we learn to attribute to it, by finding it, with some variations according to time and place, diffused over the whole face...
Page 23 - BALL-FLOWER*, an ornament resembling a ball placed in a circular flower, the three petals of which form a cup round it : this ornament is usually found inserted in a hollow moulding, and is generally characteristic of the Decorated style of the fourteenth century...
Page 94 - Agreed that the font of stone formerly belonging to the church shall be set up in the antient place, and that the other now standing near the desk be taken down.
Page 124 - At the north end of the high altar there was a goodly fine MtcroH of brass, where they sung the Epistle and Gospel, with a great Pelican on the height of it, finely gilt, billing her blood out of her breast to feed her young ones...
Page 200 - Shrine was exalted with most curious workmanship, of fine and costly green marble, all tinned and gilt with gold ; having four seats or places, convenient underneath the Shrine, for the pilgrims or lame men, sitting...
Page 105 - It is characterised by the pointed arch; by pillars which are extended so as to lose all trace of classical proportions ; by shafts which are placed side by side, often with different thicknesses, and are variously clustered and combined. Its mouldings, cornices, and capitals, have no longer the classical shapes and members ; square edges, rectangular surfaces, pilasters and entablatures, disappear ; the elements of building become slender, detached, repeated, and multiplied ; they assume forms implying...

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