A Glossary of Words Used in the Neighbourhood of Sheffield, Volume 22, Issue 1

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English dialect society, 1888 - English language - 331 pages
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Common terms and phrases

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Page 301 - This is the thing which the Lord doth command concerning the daughters of Zelophehad, saying, Let them marry to whom they think best ; only to the family of the tribe of their father shall they marry.
Page lxxvii - yesterday, and know nothing, because our days upon earth are a shadow. Shall not they teach thee and tell thee, and utter words out of their heart?
Page 118 - There was a jolly miller and he lived by himself, As the mill went round he gained his wealth ; One hand in the hopper, and the other in the bag, As the mill went round he made his
Page 303 - Diddle, diddle, dumpling ; my son John Went to bed with his breeches on ; One stocking off, and one stocking on, Diddle, diddle, dumpling, my son John.
Page liii - In some parts of the Highlands the young folks of a hamlet meet in the moors on the first of May. They cut a table in the green sod, of a round figure, by cutting a trench in the ground of such circumference as to hold the whole company. They then kindle a fire and dress a repast of eggs and milk in the consistence of a custard,
Page 82 - The name of certain small rents which were formerly paid to the lord of the great manor of Sheffield by the inhabitants of the Frith of Hawksworth for liberty of common. The rents were extinguished by an Inclosure Act about thirty years ago, and the term will therefore soon be forgotten. That the word may be
Page lxxvii - of the former age, and prepare thyself for the search of their fathers. For we are but as yesterday, and know nothing, because our days upon earth are a shadow. Shall not they teach thee and tell thee, and utter words out of their heart?
Page 196 - by the water, Crying out and weeping For a young man. Rise, Sally, rise, Dry up your eyes ; Turn to the east, Turn to the west. Turn to the young man That you love the best. The disconsolate one chooses the young man
Page 323 - Push elsewhither all the thick black clouds, over great fens, high forests and wildernesses. But unto us ploughers and sowers give a fruitful season and sweet rain. Holy Thunder (pöha Picken) guard our seedfield, that it bear good straw below, good ears above, and good grain within."—
Page xvi - The Cutler's Song. Cum all yo cutlin heroes, where'ersome'er yo be. All yo wot works at flat-backs, cum lissen unto me; A baskitful for a shillin, To mak em we are willin, Or swap em for red herrins, ahr bellies tubbe fillin, Or swap em for red herrins, ahr bellies tubbe fillin. A