A Grammar of the Icelandic Or Old Norse Tongue, Tr. from the Swedish of Erasmus Rask by George Webbe Dasent ...

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W. Pickering, 1843 - Old Norse language - 272 pages
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Contents

I
iii
II
1
III
6
IV
34
V
41
VI
49
VII
77
VIII
94
XIV
183
XV
185
XVI
186
XVII
190
XVIII
195
XIX
202
XX
204
XXI
211

IX
108
X
141
XI
143
XII
170
XIII
180
XXII
222
XXIII
223
XXIV
227
XXV
230
XXVI
241

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Page vii - Putting aside the study of Old Norse for the sake of its magnificent literature, and considering it merely as an accessory help for the English student, we shall find it of immense advantage, not only in tracing the rise of words and idioms, but still more in clearing up many dark points in our early history...
Page 224 - ... twining around a cavern mouth; the wind at sea; the bitterns wheeling in flight against the sky ; or raindrops gleaming in the sun. The most famous Malay form is the pantun, the brief quatrain so often devoted to the theme of love. Its apparent simplicity in fact involves a four-line verse, in which the first line rhymes with the third, the second with the fourth. In literal terms, the first two lines seem to have little connection in sense with the last two and the whole quatrain to fall into...
Page 207 - and "Ours "have been successfully revived — the one at the beginning, the other at the end of the season, while "Good for Nothing,
Page iii - Translation >vas undertaken to farther my own studies in the Old Norse, it has been lately revised, or rather rewritten, and is now offered to the English reader in the hope that it may excite attention toward a language and literature, of vast importance to the English student, but hitherto little understood or valued in England.
Page 204 - The strophe or song as it is called generally contains eight verses or lines, four of which are so united that every half of the strophe contains an independent thought, and each of these halves is again divided into two parts, which form a fourth part of the whole strophe, and contain two lines belonging together and united by alliteration. The...
Page vi - of it - should have a thorough knowledge of Anglo Saxon, and Anglo Norman, of our Old, Middle, and New English, beside a considerable proficiency in the Old Norse, and early German tongues. There are men in England capable of doing this, but as yet they are few and far between.
Page vi - ... Schools and Universities, men sufficiently acquainted with their native tongue from its rise till the present day to instruct our youth in the speech and Literature of their country. To some this may seem an easy task, if it be so easy I would it were done, but perhaps it is harder than many...
Page 254 - ... bare this scathe worst of them all, for he could best deem what a mickle loss and lessening there was to the Asa in the falling away of Balldr. But when the Gods came to themselves, then quoth Friggr, and asked : " Who might be there with the Asa, who would win for his own all her love and goodwill (and this, said she, he shall have), if he will ride on the way to Hel and try if he can find Balldr, and bid Hel a ransom if she will let Balldr fare home to Asgard.
Page 259 - GuSriSr! at bii munt gipt vera islenzkum manni, ok munu langar vera samfarar ykkrar, ok mart manna mun frá...
Page 205 - ... belonging together, three words occur (in the oldest poems frequently only two), beginning with the same letters, two of which must be in the first, while the third is usually at the beginning of the second line. The third and last of these letters is called the chief letter (hofuftstafr, headstave), because it is regarded as ruling over the two others, which depend on it, and have the name sub-letters (studlar, supporters). The lines are metrically divided into accented and unaccented syllables....

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