A Grammar of the Kaffir Language

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Wesleyan missionary society, 1872 - Kafir language (Bantu) - 183 pages
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Page iv - In the present state of our information, it appears probable that all the languages of South Africa may be classed under two divisions or families. The first and most ancient, which was probably that spoken by the earliest inhabitants who found their way to this extremity of the globe, comprehends the dialects spoken by the Namacquas, Bushmen, Koranas, and Hottentots. These dialects (all of which, though differing from each other, are radically the same) were once spoken throughout all South Africa,...
Page v - ... Hottentot dialect. Mr. Boyce had the curiosity to compile a sketch of the grammatical peculiarities of the Hottentot language, as spoken by the Gonaqua Hottentots in Kafir land ; but we trust that the prevalence of Dutch or English among the few tribes which yet speak these uncouth and unpronounceable dialects, will soon supersede the necessity of further literary labours, which in this language appear hitherto to have been more curious than useful. ""The second division or family of the South...
Page v - The second division, or family, of the South African languages comprises the sister dialects spoken by the Kaffir and Bechuana tribes, to the east and north of the colony. That the relationship subsisting between the Kaffir and...
Page iv - ... state of our information, it appears probable that all the languages of South Africa may be classed under two divisions or families. The first and most ancient, which was probably that spoken by the earliest inhabitants who found their way to this extremity of the globe, comprehends the dialects spoken by the Namacquas, Bushmen, Koranas, and Hottentots. These dialects (all of which, though differing from each other, are radically the same) were once spoken throughout all South Africa, as far...
Page vi - Natives conveyed from the interior to Mozambique, and from thence taken to the Bechuana country, have found no difficulty in making themselves understood ; sufficient proof, this, of a radical identity of language." This opinion is supported by that of Dr. Adamson, of Cape Town, who has had the opportunity of inspecting two manuscript grammars, prepared by Dr. Krapf, one of which appears to be...
Page v - ... language. Along the northern frontier of the colony, the Namacqua, Koranna and Bushmen dialects are yet spoken by a numerous yet scattered population. These dialects are entirely different in their grammatical construction from the Kafir language ; they abound in those peculiar and...
Page v - ... Kafir in their grammatical construction, and many of the words of the language spoken near Mombas on the east coast, are pure Kafir and Bechuana. " The Kafir language has many traces of its eastern origin in the frequent occurrence of words which are plainly of Hebrew or Arabic extraction ; and in the use of what grammarians technically term epenthetic and paragogic letters or syllables.
Page iv - ... these dialects — all of which, though differing from each other, are radically the same — were once spoken throughout all South Africa as far as the Kei River ; but now, within the old colonial border, Dutch has almost entirely supplanted them ; and beyond the old border to the Kei — the Kafirs having conquered that country from the Hottentot tribes — no trace of the Hottentot language remains, unless it be that the Kafirs have adopted the disagreeable clicks from their Hottentot predecessors,...
Page 2 - The number of letters required for the symbolizing of consonants is seventeen, as follows (in alphabetical order): b, c, d, f, g, h, j, k, 1, m, n, p, s, t, w, y, z.

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